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Neurourol Urodyn. 2018 Jan;37(1):346-353. doi: 10.1002/nau.23300. Epub 2017 May 2.

The effects of Pilates method on pelvic floor muscle strength in patients with post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence: A randomized clinical trial.

Author information

1
Physiotherapist, State University of Londrina, Londrina, Brazil.
2
Statistics Department, State University of Londrina, Londrina, Brazil.
3
Physiotherapy Department, Center for Health Sciences, State University of Londrina, Londrina, Brazil.
4
Department of Urology, Video Urodynamics Unit, Moinhos de Vento Hospital, Porto Alegre, Brazil.
5
Department of Surgery, Center for Health Sciences, State University of Londrina, Londrina, Brazil.

Abstract

AIMS:

To assess the effects of a Pilates exercise program compared to conventional pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) protocol on pelvic floor muscle strength (PFMS) in patients with post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence.

METHODS:

Patients were randomized into three treatment groups (G1: Pilates, G2: electrical stimulation combined with PFMT, and G3: control group). Duration of therapy was 10 weeks. Baseline assessment included the 24 h pad-test and the ICI-Q questionnaire. PFMS was measured using a manometric perineometry device at baseline and 4 months after radical prostatectomy (RP). The level of significance was P < 0.05.

RESULTS:

One hundred twenty three patients were randomized and 104 patients completed the study protocol (G1: n = 34; G2: n = 35; G3: n = 35). Post-treatment assessment showed statistically significant improvements in maximum strength in G2, increased endurance in G1 and G2, and increment of muscle power in all three groups (P < 0.05). However, there were no significant differences in the mean changes of maximum strength, endurance, and muscle power between groups after treatment (P > 0.05). G1 and G2 achieved a higher number of fully continent patients than G3 (P < 0.05). At the end of treatment, 59% of patients in G1, 54% in G2, and 26% in G3 were continent (no pads/day).

CONCLUSIONS:

Improvements in PFMS parameters were distinct among active treatment groups versus controls, but did not predict recovery of urinary continence at final assessment. The Pilates method promoted similar outcomes in the proportion of fully continent patients when compared to conventional PFMT 4 months after RP.

KEYWORDS:

Pilates protocol; pelvic floor muscle strength; radical prostatectomy; urinary incontinence

PMID:
28464434
DOI:
10.1002/nau.23300

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