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Health Policy. 2017 Jun;121(6):691-698. doi: 10.1016/j.healthpol.2017.03.020. Epub 2017 Apr 7.

Economic losses and burden of disease by medical conditions in Norway.

Author information

1
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Bergen, Norway; Department of Health Management and Health Economics, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: Jonas.Minet.Kinge@fhi.no.
2
Norwegian Directorate of Health, Oslo, Norway.
3
Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, Seattle, WA, USA.
4
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Bergen, Norway; Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
5
Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.

Abstract

We explore the correlation between disease specific estimates of economic losses and the burden of disease. This is based on data for Norway in 2013 from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) project and the Norwegian Directorate of Health. The diagnostic categories were equivalent to the ICD-10 chapters. Mental disorders topped the list of the costliest conditions in Norway in 2013, and musculoskeletal disorders caused the highest production loss, while neoplasms caused the greatest burden in terms of DALYs. There was a positive and significant association between economic losses and burden of disease. Neoplasms, circulatory diseases, mental and musculoskeletal disorders all contributed to large health care expenditures. Non-fatal conditions with a high prevalence in working populations, like musculoskeletal and mental disorders, caused the largest production loss, while fatal conditions such as neoplasms and circulatory disease did not, since they occur mostly at old age. The magnitude of the production loss varied with the estimation method. The estimations presented in this study did not include reductions in future consumption, by net-recipients, due to premature deaths. Non-fatal diseases are thus even more burdensome, relative to fatal diseases, than the production loss in this study suggests. Hence, ignoring production losses may underestimate the economic losses from chronic diseases in countries with an epidemiological profile similar to Norway.

KEYWORDS:

Disability adjusted life years (DALYs); Health care expenditures; Production loss; Years of life lived with disability; Years of life lost

PMID:
28461038
DOI:
10.1016/j.healthpol.2017.03.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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