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Dev Psychol. 2017 May;53(5):845-859. doi: 10.1037/dev0000290.

Perceptual individuation training (but not mere exposure) reduces implicit racial bias in preschool children.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Hangzhou Normal University.
2
Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Delaware.
3
Department of Psychology, University of California, San Diego.
4
Laboratoire de Psychologie et NeuroCognition, Université de Grenoble Alpes.
5
Dr. Eric Jackman Institute of Child Study, University of Toronto.

Abstract

Two studies with preschool-age children examined the effectiveness of perceptual individuation training at reducing racial bias (Study 1, N = 32; Study 2, N = 56). We found that training preschool-age children to individuate other-race faces resulted in a reduction in implicit racial bias while mere exposure to other-race faces produced no such effect. We also showed that neither individuation training nor mere exposure reduced explicit racial bias. Theoretically, our findings provide strong evidence for a causal link between individual-level face processing and implicit racial bias, and are consistent with the newly proposed perceptual-social linkage hypothesis. Practically, our findings suggest that offering children experiences that allow them to increase their expertise in processing individual other-race faces will help reduce their implicit racial bias. (PsycINFO Database Record.

PMID:
28459274
PMCID:
PMC5429030
DOI:
10.1037/dev0000290
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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