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J Electromyogr Kinesiol. 2017 Jun;34:93-101. doi: 10.1016/j.jelekin.2017.04.007. Epub 2017 Apr 24.

Whole-body vibration induces distinct reflex patterns in human soleus muscle.

Author information

1
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department, Bagcilar Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey. Electronic address: ilhankaracan@hotmail.com.
2
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department, Bagcilar Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.
3
Electrical and Electronics Engineer, Istanbul, Turkey.
4
Physiology Department, Koc University School of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey.

Abstract

The neuronal mechanisms underlying whole body vibration (WBV)-induced muscular reflex (WBV-IMR) are not well understood. To define a possible pathway for WBV-IMR, this study investigated the effects of WBV amplitude on WBV-IMR latency by surface electromyography analysis of the soleus muscle in human adult volunteers. The tendon (T) reflex was also induced to evaluate the level of presynaptic Ia inhibition during WBV. WBV-IMR latency was shorter when induced by low- as compared to medium- or high-amplitude WBV (33.9±5.3msvs. 43.8±3.6 and 44.1±4.2ms, respectively). There was no difference in latencies between T-reflex elicited before WBV (33.8±2.4ms) and WBV-IMR induced by low-amplitude WBV. Presynaptic Ia inhibition was absent during low-amplitude WBV but was present during medium- and high-amplitude WBV. Consequently, WBV induces short- or long-latency reflexes depending on the vibration amplitude. During low-amplitude WBV, muscle spindle activation may induce the short- but not the long-latency WBV-IMR. Furthermore, unlike the higher amplitude WBV, low-amplitude WBV does not induce presynaptic inhibition at the Ia synaptic terminals.

KEYWORDS:

Muscle spindle; Tonic vibration reflex; Vibration

PMID:
28457998
DOI:
10.1016/j.jelekin.2017.04.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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