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J Dairy Sci. 2017 Apr 26. pii: S0022-0302(17)30365-X. doi: 10.3168/jds.2016-12503. [Epub ahead of print]

Corn grain-processing method interacts with calcium salts of palm fatty acids supplementation on milk production and energy balance of early-lactation cows grazing tropical pasture.

Author information

1
Department of Animal Science, University of São Paulo, Piracicaba, São Paulo, 13418-900, Brazil.
2
Department of Animal Science, University of São Paulo, Piracicaba, São Paulo, 13418-900, Brazil; Department of Animal Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing 48824.
3
Department of Animal Science, University of São Paulo, Piracicaba, São Paulo, 13418-900, Brazil. Electronic address: fapsantos@usp.br.

Abstract

The objective of our study was to investigate the associative effects of feeding Ca salts of palm fatty acids (FA) and corn grain-processing method on production, nutrient digestibility, energy balance, and carryover effects of early-lactation dairy cows grazing a tropical pasture. Treatment diets were offered from 3 to 16 wk postpartum (treatment period), in which all cows grazed elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum L. Cameroon) and treatments were added to a concentrate supplement. Treatments were flint corn grain-processing method either as fine ground (FGC) or steam-flaked (SFC) associated with Ca salts of palm FA supplementation either not supplemented or supplemented (CSPO). From 17 to 40 wk postpartum (carryover period) all cows received a common diet fed as total mixed ration. During the treatment period, a tendency for an interaction between CSPO and corn grain-processing method were observed for milk yield, milk fat yield, and energy-corrected milk (ECM), as CSPO caused them to increased to a greater extent in the FGC diet compared with the SFC diet. Furthermore, a tendency for an interaction between CSPO and corn grain-processing method was observed for body weight change, because CSPO increased body weight loss in the FGC diet but not in the SFC diet. The CSPO increased milk yield, milk fat yield, 3.5% fat-corrected milk, ECM, and cumulative milk yield compared with not supplemented. Also, CSPO increased energy intake, milk energy output, and energy partitioning toward milk, whereas reduced energy was allocated to body reserves. The SFC increased milk yield, ECM, milk protein yield, milk casein yield, and cumulative milk yield, and decreased milk urea N compared with FGC. The SFC compared with FGC also increased body condition score and body weight change, and increased energy partitioning toward body reserves. During the carryover period, an interaction between CSPO and corn grain-processing method was observed for milk yield, which occurred because CSPO maintained higher milk yield in the FGC diet but not in the SFC diet. Therefore, in the carryover period, the additive effect between SFC and CSPO that occurred in the treatment period was not maintained throughout the carryover period. However, CSPO increased yields of milk fat, protein, casein as well as fat-corrected milk and ECM. In conclusion, corn grain-processing method interacts with CSPO supplementation on production responses and carryover effects of grazing cows. When CSPO was fed in the FGC diet, milk production increased to a greater extent than when fed in the SFC diet, but also caused greater mobilization of reserves at early lactation. This suggests an interaction between fat supplementation and corn grain-processing method on energy partitioning of dairy cows. Also, both supplementation with CSPO and SFC were effective strategies to increase energy intake and yields of milk and milk solids. The carryover effect on milk production was greater for CSPO supplementation than corn grain-processing method, whereas feeding SFC diets had lower mobilization of reserves and less body weight and body condition score variation throughout lactation.

KEYWORDS:

calcium salts; corn processing; palm fatty acids; steam-flaked corn

PMID:
28456407
DOI:
10.3168/jds.2016-12503
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