Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Gynecol Oncol. 2017 Jul;146(1):153-160. doi: 10.1016/j.ygyno.2017.04.012. Epub 2017 Apr 26.

High glucocorticoid receptor expression predicts short progression-free survival in ovarian cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Section of Hematology-Oncology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States. Electronic address: jveneris@medicine.bsd.uchicago.edu.
2
Women's Health Integrated Research Center, Inova Health System, Annandale, VA, United States.
3
Department of Pathology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States.
4
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Section of Gynecologic Oncology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States; The University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, IL, United States.
5
Department of Pathology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States.
6
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Section of Gynecologic Oncology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, United States.
7
Department of Medicine, Section of Hematology-Oncology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States; Ben May Department for Cancer Biology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States; The University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, IL, United States.
8
Department of Medicine, Section of Hematology-Oncology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States; The University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, IL, United States. Electronic address: gfleming@medicine.bsd.uchicago.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the association of tumor glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression and patient outcome in ovarian cancer.

METHODS:

GR expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays of specimens from 481 patients with ovarian cancer and 4 patients with benign conditions. Low GR expression was defined as an intensity of 0 or 1+ and high GR as 2+ or 3+ in >1% of tumor cells. Analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship of GR expression with clinical characteristics, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS).

RESULTS:

GR protein was highly expressed in 133 of 341 (39.0%) tumors from patients who underwent upfront cytoreduction surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. High GR expression was more common in serous tumors (p<0.001), high grade tumors (p<0.001), and advanced stage tumors (p=0.037). Median PFS was significantly decreased in cases with high GR (20.4months) compared to those with low GR (36.0months, HR=1.66, 95% CI 1.29-2.14, p<0.001). GR remained an independent prognostic factor for PFS in multivariate analysis. OS was not associated with GR status.

CONCLUSIONS:

These data suggest that high GR expression correlates with poor prognosis and support the hypothesis that modulating GR activity in combination with chemotherapy may improve outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

Epithelial ovarian cancer; Glucocorticoid receptor; Hormone receptor; Survival; Tumor markers

PMID:
28456378
PMCID:
PMC5955699
DOI:
10.1016/j.ygyno.2017.04.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center