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Cancer Res. 2017 Jul 1;77(13):3655-3665. doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-16-3199. Epub 2017 Apr 28.

CXCL1 Is Critical for Premetastatic Niche Formation and Metastasis in Colorectal Cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina.
2
Laboratory for Inflammation and Cancer, Biodesign Institute of Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona.
3
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina. duboisrn@musc.edu.
4
Department of Research and Division of Gastroenterology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona.

Abstract

Emerging evidence suggests that the primary tumor influences the development of supportive metastatic microenvironments, referred to as premetastatic niches, in certain distant organs before arrival of metastatic cells. However, the mechanisms underlying the contributions of the primary tumor to premetastatic niche formation are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that colorectal carcinoma cells secrete VEGFA, which stimulates tumor-associated macrophages to produce CXCL1 in the primary tumor. Elevation of CXCL1 in premetastatic liver tissue recruited CXCR2-positive myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) to form a premetastatic niche that ultimately promoted liver metastases. Importantly, premetastatic liver-infiltrating MDSCs induced tumor cell survival without involvement of innate or adaptive immune responses. Our study provides the first evidence that primary malignant cell-secreted VEGFA stimulates tumor-associated macrophages to produce CXCL1, which recruits CXCR2-positive MDSCs to form a premetastatic niche to promote liver metastases. Our findings not only shed light on how the tumor microenvironment contributes to premetastatic niche formation at distant sites, but they also provide comprehensive insights into how MDSCs are recruited to other organs where they contribute to metastatic spread of disease. Moreover, our work also provides a rationale for development of CXCR2 antagonists to inhibit or prevent metastatic spread of disease. Cancer Res; 77(13); 3655-65. ©2017 AACR.

PMID:
28455419
PMCID:
PMC5877403
DOI:
10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-16-3199
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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