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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2017 Dec;98(12):2566-2577. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2017.03.024. Epub 2017 Apr 26.

Associations Between Self-Efficacy and Secondary Health Conditions in People Living With Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Rehabilitation, Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Center of Excellence in Rehabilitation Medicine, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht, and De Hoogstraat Rehabilitation, Utrecht, The Netherlands; University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Groningen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: t.vandiemen@maartenskliniek.nl.
2
Center of Excellence in Rehabilitation Medicine, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht, and De Hoogstraat Rehabilitation, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
3
Department of Rehabilitation, Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
4
University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Groningen, The Netherlands.
5
Center of Excellence in Rehabilitation Medicine, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht, and De Hoogstraat Rehabilitation, Utrecht, The Netherlands; University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To describe the association between self-efficacy and secondary health conditions (SHCs) in people living with spinal cord injury (SCI).

DATA SOURCES:

PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and CINAHL were systematically searched from database inception to September 2016.

STUDY SELECTION:

Studies describing patients living with SCI in which self-efficacy was measured by a standardized questionnaire and an association was made with somatic or psychological SHCs.

DATA EXTRACTION:

An independent extraction by multiple observers was performed based on the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology statements checklist. A meta-analysis concerning the association between self-efficacy and SHCs in people with SCI was performed if a minimum of 4 comparable studies were available.

DATA SYNTHESIS:

Of 670 unique articles screened, 22 met the inclusion criteria. Seven of these 22 studies investigated associations between self-efficacy and somatic SHCs. Only a trend toward an association between higher self-efficacy and less pain, fatigue, number of SHCs, and limitations caused by SHCs was found. Twenty-one studies described the association between self-efficacy and psychological SHCs. All correlations of higher self-efficacy with fewer depressive (18 studies) and anxiety symptoms (7 studies) were significant, and meta-analysis showed a strong negative correlation of -.536 (-.584 to -.484) and -.493 (-.577 to -.399), respectively. A small number of studies (2) showed a trend toward a positive correlation between self-efficacy and quality of life.

CONCLUSIONS:

Self-efficacy is negatively associated with depressive and anxiety symptoms in SCI. Therefore, self-efficacy seems an important target in the rehabilitation of patients living with SCI. More research is necessary to clarify the associations between self-efficacy and somatic SHCs. Future research should also focus on different types of self-efficacy and their association with SHCs.

KEYWORDS:

Complications; Mental health; Quality of life; Rehabilitation; Self efficacy; Spinal cord injuries

PMID:
28455193
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2017.03.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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