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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2017 Dec;98(12):2422-2432. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2017.03.025. Epub 2017 Apr 26.

Associations Between Resilience, Community Belonging, and Social Participation Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Results From the Eastern Townships Population Health Survey.

Author information

1
School of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada; Research Centre on Aging, Health and Social Services Centre-Eastern Townships Integrated University Centre for Health & Social Services-Sherbrooke Hospital University Centre (CIUSSS de l'Estrie-CHUS), Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada; Interdisciplinary Research Group on Resilience, Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation of Greater Montreal, Montréal, Québec, Canada. Electronic address: Melanie.Levasseur@USherbrooke.ca.
2
Interdisciplinary Research Group on Resilience, Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation of Greater Montreal, Montréal, Québec, Canada; Department of Family and Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada; CIUSSS de l'Estrie-CHUS, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada.
3
Interdisciplinary Research Group on Resilience, Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation of Greater Montreal, Montréal, Québec, Canada; Department of Speech Language Therapy, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Trois-Rivières, Québec, Canada.
4
Department of Management and Human Resources, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada.
5
Department of Human and Social Sciences, Université du Québec à Chicoutimi, Saguenay, Québec, Canada.
6
Research Centre on Aging, Health and Social Services Centre-Eastern Townships Integrated University Centre for Health & Social Services-Sherbrooke Hospital University Centre (CIUSSS de l'Estrie-CHUS), Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada; CIUSSS de l'Estrie-CHUS, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada; Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the associations between resilience, community belonging, and social participation, and the moderating effect of resilience on the association between community belonging and social participation among community-dwelling older adults.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional; secondary analyses of the Eastern Townships Population Health Survey.

SETTING:

Community.

PARTICIPANTS:

A sample (N=4541) of women (n=2485) and men (n=2056) aged ≥60 years was randomly selected according to area. Most participants had <14 years of schooling, owned their dwelling, were retired, had 1 or 2 chronic conditions, and did not have depressive symptoms.

INTERVENTIONS:

Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Self-reported data on age, education, depressive symptoms, social participation, community belonging, and resilience were collected by phone interviewer-administered questionnaire. A social participation scale measured frequency of participation in 8 community activities. A 4-point Likert scale ranging from "very strong" to "very weak" estimated sense of belonging to the local community. Social participation and sense of belonging questions came from Statistics Canada surveys. Resilience was assessed with the 10-item Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, capturing the ability to cope with adversity.

RESULTS:

Controlling for age, education, and psychological distress, greater resilience and community belonging were associated with greater social participation among women (R2=.13; P<.001) and men (R2=.09; P<.001). The association between community belonging and social participation varied as a function of resilience, especially in men. Greater community belonging further enhanced social participation, especially among women (P=.03) and men (P<.01) with greater resilience (moderator effect).

CONCLUSIONS:

Resilience moderates the association between community belonging and social participation among community-dwelling older women and, especially, men. Interventions targeting social participation should consider the potential impact of resilience on improving community belonging. Future studies should investigate why resilience moderates associations between community belonging and social participation, and how to enhance resilience among older adults.

KEYWORDS:

Adaptation, psychological; Community integration; Community participation; Quebec; Rehabilitation; Residence characteristics

PMID:
28455192
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2017.03.025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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