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J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2017 Sep;75(9):1809-1816. doi: 10.1016/j.joms.2017.03.045. Epub 2017 Apr 4.

Replacing Heavily Damaged Teeth by Third Molar Autotransplantation With the Use of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography and Rapid Prototyping.

Author information

1
Resident in Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.
2
Dentist, Department of Oral Function and Restorative Dentistry, Academic Center for Dentistry Amsterdam, Research Institute MOVE, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
3
Dentist, Professor, and Department Head, Department of Oral Function and Restorative Dentistry, Academic Center for Dentistry Amsterdam, Research Institute MOVE, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
4
Maxillofacial Surgeon, Professor, and Department Head, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. Electronic address: J.P.R.van_Merkesteyn@lumc.nl.

Abstract

This article describes the autotransplantation of third molars to replace heavily damaged premolars and molars. Specifically, this article reports on the use of preoperative cone-beam computed tomographic planning and 3-dimensional (3D) printed replicas of donor teeth to prepare artificial tooth sockets. In the present case, an 18-year-old patient underwent autotransplantation of 3 third molars to replace 1 premolar and 2 molars that were heavily damaged after trauma. Approximately 1 year after the traumatic incident, autotransplantation with the help of 3D planning and rapid prototyping was performed. The right maxillary third molar replaced the right maxillary first premolar. The 2 mandibular wisdom teeth replaced the left mandibular first and second molars. During the surgical procedure, artificial tooth sockets were prepared with the help of 3D printed donor tooth copies to prevent iatrogenic damage to the actual donor teeth. These replicas of the donor teeth were designed based on the preoperative cone-beam computed tomogram and manufactured with the help of 3D printing techniques. The use of a replica of the donor tooth resulted in a predictable and straightforward procedure, with extra-alveolar times shorter than 2 minutes for all transplantations. The transplanted teeth were placed in infraocclusion and fixed with a suture splint. Postoperative follow-up showed physiologic integration of the transplanted teeth and a successful outcome for all transplants. In conclusion, this technique facilitates a straightforward and predictable procedure for autotransplantation of third molars. The use of printed analogues of the donor teeth decreases the risk of iatrogenic damage and the extra-alveolar time of the transplanted tooth is minimized. This facilitates a successful outcome.

PMID:
28453949
DOI:
10.1016/j.joms.2017.03.045
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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