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Cardiovasc Res. 2017 May 1;113(6):564-585. doi: 10.1093/cvr/cvx049.

Novel targets and future strategies for acute cardioprotection: Position Paper of the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Cellular Biology of the Heart.

Author information

1
The Hatter Cardiovascular Institute, University College London, 67 Chenies Mews, London WC1E 6HX, UK; The National Institute of Health Research University College London Hospitals Biomedical Research Centre, 149 Tottenham Court Road London, W1T 7DN, UK; Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disorders Program, Duke-National University of Singapore, 8 College Road, Singapore 169857; National Heart Research Institute Singapore, National Heart Centre Singapore, 5 Hospital Dr, Singapore 169609, Singapore; Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Singapore, Singapore; Barts Heart Centre, St Bartholomew's Hospital, London, UK.
2
Department of Cardiology, Vall d Hebron University Hospital and Research Institute. Universitat Autònoma, Passeig de la Vall d'Hebron, 119-129, 08035 Barcelona, Spain.
3
Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital Skejby, Palle Juul-Jensens Boulevard 99, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark.
4
The Hatter Cardiovascular Institute, University College London, 67 Chenies Mews, London WC1E 6HX, UK.
5
Department of Physiology and Cell Biology, College of Medicine, University of South Alabama, 5851 USA Dr. N., MSB 3074, Mobile, AL 36688, USA.
6
Experimental Renal and Cardiovascular Research, Department of Nephropathology, Institute of Pathology, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nßrnberg, Schloßplatz 4, 91054 Erlangen, Germany.
7
Department of Cardiology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA.
8
Department of Medicine,  Hatter  Institute for Cardiovascular Research in Africa and South African Medical Research Council Inter-University Cape Heart Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Chris Barnard Building, Anzio Road, Observatory, 7925, Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa.
9
Tamman Cardiovascular Research Institute, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel; Neufeld Cardiac Research Institute, Tel-Aviv University, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, 5265601, Israel; Sheba Center for Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cell, and Tissue Engineering, Tel Hashomer, 5265601, Israel.
10
Center of Aging Sciences and Translational Medicine - CESI-MeT, "G. d'Annunzio" University, Chieti, Italy; Institute of Cardiology, Department of Neurosciences, Imaging, and Clinical Sciences, "G. d'Annunzio University, Chieti, Italy; Texas Heart Institute and University of Texas Medical School in Houston, Department of Internal Medicine, 6770 Bertner Avenue, Houston, Texas 77030 USA.
11
Explorations Fonctionnelles Cardiovasculaires, Hôpital Louis Pradel, 28 Avenue du Doyen Jean Lépine, 69500 Bron, France; UMR 1060 (CarMeN), Université Claude Bernard Lyon, 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69100 Villeurbanne, France.
12
Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Division of Cardiology, Federico II University Corso Umberto I, 40, 80138 Napoli, Italy.
13
Department of Cardiology, University of Angers, University Hospital of Angers, 4 Rue Larrey, 49100 Angers, France.
14
Institute of Physiology, Justus-Liebig, University of Giessen, Ludwigstraße 23, 35390 Gießen, Germany.
15
Cardiology and UMC Utrecht Regenerative Medicine Center, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht, Netherlands.
16
Division Heart and Lungs, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht, Netherlands.
17
Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Emory University, 201 Dowman Dr, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA.
18
The Hatter Cardiovascular Institute, University College London, 67 Chenies Mews, London WC1E 6HX, UK; The National Institute of Health Research University College London Hospitals Biomedical Research Centre, 149 Tottenham Court Road London, W1T 7DN, UK.
19
Cardiovascular Research Group, Department of Medical Biology, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Hansine Hansens veg 18, 9019 Tromsø, Norway.
20
Institute for Pathophysiology, West-German Heart and Vascular Center, University Hospital Essen, Hufelandstrasse 55, 45147 Essen, Germany.
21
Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapy, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Nagyvárad tér 4, 1089 Hungary; Pharmahungary Group, Graphisoft Park, 7 Záhony street, Budapest, H-1031, Hungary.

Abstract

Ischaemic heart disease and the heart failure that often results, remain the leading causes of death and disability in Europe and worldwide. As such, in order to prevent heart failure and improve clinical outcomes in patients presenting with an acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery, novel therapies are required to protect the heart against the detrimental effects of acute ischaemia/reperfusion injury (IRI). During the last three decades, a wide variety of ischaemic conditioning strategies and pharmacological treatments have been tested in the clinic-however, their translation from experimental to clinical studies for improving patient outcomes has been both challenging and disappointing. Therefore, in this Position Paper of the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Cellular Biology of the Heart, we critically analyse the current state of ischaemic conditioning in both the experimental and clinical settings, provide recommendations for improving its translation into the clinical setting, and highlight novel therapeutic targets and new treatment strategies for reducing acute myocardial IRI.

KEYWORDS:

Cardioprotection; Ischaemia; Ischaemic conditioning; Myocardial Infarction; Reperfusion

PMID:
28453734
DOI:
10.1093/cvr/cvx049
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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