Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nat Microbiol. 2017 Apr 28;2:17064. doi: 10.1038/nmicrobiol.2017.64.

Variability and host density independence in inductions-based estimates of environmental lysogeny.

Author information

1
Department of Biology, San Diego State University, 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, California 92182, USA.
2
Department of Mathematics and Statistics, San Diego State University, 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, California 92182, USA.
3
College of Marine Science, University of South Florida, 140 Seventh Avenue South, St Petersburg, Florida 33701, USA.
4
Department of Botany, University of British Columbia, 3529-6270 University Boulevard, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4, Canada.
5
Computational Science Research Center, San Diego State University, 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, California 92182, USA.
6
Department of Computer Science, San Diego State University, 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, California 92182, USA.
7
Viral Information Institute, San Diego State University, 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, California 92182, USA.
8
Department of Mechanical Engineering, San Diego State University, 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, California 92182, USA.
9
Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego, 950 Gilman Drive, California 92903, USA.
10
Rainbow Rock, Ocean View, Hawaii 96737, USA.

Abstract

Temperate bacterial viruses (phages) may enter a symbiosis with their host cell, forming a unit called a lysogen. Infection and viral replication are disassociated in lysogens until an induction event such as DNA damage occurs, triggering viral-mediated lysis. The lysogen-lytic viral reproduction switch is central to viral ecology, with diverse ecosystem impacts. It has been argued that lysogeny is favoured in phages at low host densities. This paradigm is based on the fraction of chemically inducible cells (FCIC) lysogeny proxy determined using DNA-damaging mitomycin C inductions. Contrary to the established paradigm, a survey of 39 inductions publications found FCIC to be highly variable and pervasively insensitive to bacterial host density at global, within-environment and within-study levels. Attempts to determine the source(s) of variability highlighted the inherent complications in using the FCIC proxy in mixed communities, including dissociation between rates of lysogeny and FCIC values. Ultimately, FCIC studies do not provide robust measures of lysogeny or consistent evidence of either positive or negative host density dependence to the lytic-lysogenic switch. Other metrics are therefore needed to understand the drivers of the lytic-lysogenic decision in viral communities and to test models of the host density-dependent viral lytic-lysogenic switch.

PMID:
28452987
DOI:
10.1038/nmicrobiol.2017.64
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group
Loading ...
Support Center