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Global Spine J. 2017 Apr;7(1 Suppl):91S-95S. doi: 10.1177/2192568216688196. Epub 2017 Apr 1.

Perioperative Vision Loss in Cervical Spinal Surgery.

Author information

1
Swedish Neuroscience Institute, Seattle, WA, USA.
2
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
3
Kansas University Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA.
4
Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
5
Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA.
6
Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
7
New York-Presbyterian/The Allen Hospital, New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN:

Retrospective multicenter case series.

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the rate of perioperative vision loss following cervical spinal surgery.

METHODS:

Medical records for 17 625 patients from 21 high-volume surgical centers from the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network who received cervical spine surgery (levels from C2 to C7) between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011, inclusive, were reviewed to identify occurrences of vision loss following surgery.

RESULTS:

Of the 17 625 patients in the registry, there were 13 946 patients assessed for the complication of blindness. There were 9591 cases that involved only anterior surgical approaches; the remaining 4355 cases were posterior and/or circumferential fusions. There were no cases of blindness or vision loss in the postoperative period reported during the sampling period.

CONCLUSIONS:

Perioperative vision loss following cervical spinal surgery is exceedingly rare.

KEYWORDS:

PION; blindness; ischemic optic neuropathy; spine surgery

Conflict of interest statement

Declaration of Conflicting Interests: The author(s) declared the following potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: Brandon C. Gabel reports grants from AOSpine North America during the conduct of the study; Jens Chapman reports grants from AOSpine North America during the conduct of the study; Rod J. Oskouian Jr reports grants from AOSNA during the conduct of the study; Ahmad Nassr reports grants from AOSNA during the conduct of the study; Bradford L. Currier reports grants from AOSpine North America during the conduct of the study, personal fees from DePuy Spine, personal fees from Stryker Spine, personal fees from Zimmer Spine, other from Zimmer Spine, other from Tenex, other from Spinology, other from LSRS, other from AOSNA, outside the submitted work; Arjun S. Sebastian reports grants from AOSpine North America during the conduct of the study; Steven R. Hamilton reports grants from AOSpine North America during the conduct of the study; Michael G. Fehlings reports grants from AOSpine North America during the conduct of the study; Thomas E. Mroz reports other from AOSpine, grants from AOSNA during the conduct of the study, personal fees from Stryker, personal fees from Ceramtec, other from Pearl Diver, outside the submitted work; and K. Daniel Riew reports personal fees from AOSpine International, other from Global Spine Journal, other from Spine Journal, other from Neurosurgery, personal fees from Multiple Entities for defense, plantiff, grants from AOSpine, grants from Cerapedics, grants from Medtronic, personal fees from AOSpine, personal fees from NASS, personal fees from Biomet, personal fees from Medtronic, nonfinancial support from Broadwater, outside the submitted work.

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