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Science. 2017 Apr 28;356(6336):406-411. doi: 10.1126/science.aal3231.

Pcdhαc2 is required for axonal tiling and assembly of serotonergic circuitries in mice.

Author information

1
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA.
2
Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA.
4
Division of Integrative Neuroscience, Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene, New York, NY 10032, USA.
5
Departments of Genetics and Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.
6
Departments of Neuroscience and Pharmacology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA.
7
Center for Comparative Biomedicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China.
8
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. tm2472@cumc.columbia.edu.

Abstract

Serotonergic neurons project their axons pervasively throughout the brain and innervate various target fields in a space-filling manner, leading to tiled arrangements of their axon terminals to allow optimal allocation of serotonin among target neurons. Here we show that conditional deletion of the mouse protocadherin α (Pcdhα) gene cluster in serotonergic neurons disrupts local axonal tiling and global assembly of serotonergic circuitries and results in depression-like behaviors. Genetic dissection and expression profiling revealed that this role is specifically mediated by Pcdhαc2, which is the only Pcdhα isoform expressed in serotonergic neurons. We conclude that, in contrast to neurite self-avoidance, which requires single-cell identity mediated by Pcdh diversity, a single cell-type identity mediated by the common C-type Pcdh isoform is required for axonal tiling and assembly of serotonergic circuitries.

PMID:
28450636
PMCID:
PMC5529183
DOI:
10.1126/science.aal3231
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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