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Clin Ther. 2017 May;39(5):993-1002. doi: 10.1016/j.clinthera.2017.03.019. Epub 2017 Apr 24.

Cost-effectiveness of Ingenol Mebutate Gel for the Treatment of Actinic Keratosis in Greece.

Author information

1
Department of Health Economics, National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece.
2
Department of Health Economics, National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece. Electronic address: nadia.phar@gmail.com.
3
LEO Pharmaceutical Hellas S.A., Athens, Greece.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The present study aimed to perform a cost-effectiveness analysis of ingenol mebutate (IM) versus other topical alternatives for the treatment of actinic keratosis (AK).

METHODS:

The analysis used a decision tree to calculate the clinical effects and costs of AK first-line treatments, IM (2-3 days), diclofenac 3% (for 8 or 12 weeks), imiquimod 5% (for 4 or 8 weeks), during a 24-month horizon, using discrete intervals of 6 months. A hypothetical cohort of immunocompetent adult patients with clinically confirmed AK on the face and scalp or trunk and extremities was considered. Clinical data on the relative efficacy were obtained from a network meta-analysis. Inputs concerning resource use derived from an expert panel. All costs were calculated from a Greek third-party payer perspective.

FINDINGS:

IM 0.015% and 0.05% were both cost-effective compared with diclofenac and below a willingness-to-pay threshold of €30,000 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) (€199 and €167 per QALY, respectively). Comparing IM on the face and scalp AK lesions for 3 days versus imiquimod for 4 weeks resulted in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of €10,868 per QALY. IM was dominant during the 8-week imiquimod period. IM use on the trunk and extremities compared with diclofenac (8 or 12 weeks) led to incremental cost-effectiveness ratios estimated at €1584 and €1316 per QALY accordingly. Results remained robust to deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses.

IMPLICATIONS:

From a social insurance perspective in Greece, IM 0.015% and IM 0.05% could be the most cost-effective first-line topical field treatment options in all cases for AK treatment.

KEYWORDS:

actinic keratosis; cost; cost-effectiveness; ingenol mebutate; topical treatment

PMID:
28449867
DOI:
10.1016/j.clinthera.2017.03.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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