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PLoS One. 2017 Apr 27;12(4):e0176232. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0176232. eCollection 2017.

Response of Npt2a knockout mice to dietary calcium and phosphorus.

Author information

1
Endocrine Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
2
Department of Pediatrics, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China.
3
Section Endocrinology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America.
4
Gastroenterology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
5
Department of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China.
6
Pediatric Nephrology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.

Abstract

Mutations in the renal sodium-dependent phosphate co-transporters NPT2a and NPT2c have been reported in patients with renal stone disease and nephrocalcinosis, but the relative contribution of genotype, dietary calcium and phosphate to the formation of renal mineral deposits is unclear. We previously reported that renal calcium phosphate deposits persist and/or reappear in older Npt2a-/- mice supplemented with phosphate despite resolution of hypercalciuria while no deposits are seen in wild-type (WT) mice on the same diet. Addition of calcium to their diets further increased calcium phosphate deposits in Npt2a-/-, but not WT mice. The response of PTH to dietary phosphate of Npt2a-/- was blunted when compared to WT mice and the response of the urinary calcium x phosphorus product to the addition of calcium and phosphate to the diet of Npt2a-/- was increased. These finding suggests that Npt2a-/- mice respond differently to dietary phosphate when compared to WT mice. Further evaluation in the Npt2a-/- cohort on different diets suggests that urinary calcium excretion, plasma phosphate and FGF23 levels appear to be positively correlated to renal mineral deposit formation while urine phosphate levels and the urine anion gap, an indirect measure of ammonia excretion, appear to be inversely correlated. Our observations in Npt2a-/- mice, if confirmed in humans, may be relevant for the optimization of existing and the development of novel therapies to prevent nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis in human carriers of NPT2a and NPT2c mutations.

PMID:
28448530
PMCID:
PMC5407772
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0176232
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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