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Eur J Appl Physiol. 2017 Jul;117(7):1329-1338. doi: 10.1007/s00421-017-3620-2. Epub 2017 Apr 26.

Electromyographic evaluation of high-intensity elastic resistance exercises for lower extremity muscles during bed rest.

Author information

1
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Lersø Parkalle 105, 2100, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. jonasvinstrup@gmail.com.
2
Physical Activity and Human Performance Group, SMI, Department of Health Science and Technology, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark. jonasvinstrup@gmail.com.
3
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Lersø Parkalle 105, 2100, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark.
4
Research Unit in Sports and Health, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain.
5
Exercise Research Laboratory, Strength Training Research Group, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.
6
Department of Health Sciences, Public University of Navarra, Tudela, 31500, Navarra, Spain.
7
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, The Sixth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China.
8
Department of Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Health and Technology, Metropolitan University College, Copenhagen, Denmark.
9
Physical Activity and Human Performance Group, SMI, Department of Health Science and Technology, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Prolonged hospital bed rest after severe injury or disease leads to rapid muscle atrophy and strength loss. Therefore, the main aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of lower extremity strengthening exercises using elastic resistance that can be performed while lying in a hospital bed.

METHODS:

Using a cross-sectional design, 22 healthy individuals performed three consecutive repetitions of 14 different lower extremity exercises using elastic resistance, with a perceived intensity corresponding to 8 on the Borg CR-10 scale. Surface electromyography was measured on 13 lower extremity muscles and normalized to the maximal EMG (nEMG). Likewise, exercise satisfaction was evaluated by a questionnaire.

RESULTS:

All participants were able to perform all exercises without discomfort and generally rated them satisfactory. High levels of muscle activity were observed for all prime movers. For example, the "femoris muscle setting" exercise showed high levels of muscle activity for rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, and vastus medialis (79, 75, and 79% nEMG, respectively), while biceps femoris and semitendinosus were highly active during the prone knee flexion exercise with (72 and 71% nEMG, respectively) and without Kinesiology Tape (73 and 77% nEMG, respectively).

CONCLUSION:

High levels of muscle activity in the lower extremities can be achieved using elastic resistance exercises performed when lying in a hospital bed. Even though performed on healthy individuals, the present study has the potential to provide a reference table of exercises to select from when individualizing and progressing strengthening exercises during the early rehabilitation of bedridden individuals.

KEYWORDS:

Bedridden; Elastic tubing; Physical therapy; Rehabilitation; Strength training

PMID:
28447184
DOI:
10.1007/s00421-017-3620-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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