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Am J Clin Nutr. 2017 Jun;105(6):1462-1473. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.117.153148. Epub 2017 Apr 26.

Food groups and risk of all-cause mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies.

Author information

1
German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke (DIfE), Nuthetal, Germany; lukas.schwingshackl@dife.de.
2
German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke (DIfE), Nuthetal, Germany.
3
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
4
German Nutrition Society, Bonn, Germany.
5
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; and.
6
Institute for Biometry and Epidemiology, Leibniz Institute for Diabetes Research, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Dusseldorf, Germany.

Abstract

Background: Suboptimal diet is one of the most important factors in preventing early death and disability worldwide.Objective: The aim of this meta-analysis was to synthesize the knowledge about the relation between intake of 12 major food groups, including whole grains, refined grains, vegetables, fruits, nuts, legumes, eggs, dairy, fish, red meat, processed meat, and sugar-sweetened beverages, with risk of all-cause mortality.Design: We conducted a systematic search in PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar for prospective studies investigating the association between these 12 food groups and risk of all-cause mortality. Summary RRs and 95% CIs were estimated with the use of a random effects model for high-intake compared with low-intake categories, as well as for linear and nonlinear relations. Moreover, the risk reduction potential of foods was calculated by multiplying the RR by optimal intake values (serving category with the strongest association) for risk-reducing foods or risk-increasing foods, respectively.Results: With increasing intake (for each daily serving) of whole grains (RR: 0.92; 95% CI: 0.89, 0.95), vegetables (RR: 0.96; 95% CI: 0.95, 0.98), fruits (RR: 0.94; 95% CI: 0.92, 0.97), nuts (RR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.69, 0.84), and fish (RR: 0.93; 95% CI: 0.88, 0.98), the risk of all-cause mortality decreased; higher intake of red meat (RR: 1.10; 95% CI: 1.04, 1.18) and processed meat (RR: 1.23; 95% CI: 1.12, 1.36) was associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality in a linear dose-response meta-analysis. A clear indication of nonlinearity was seen for the relations between vegetables, fruits, nuts, and dairy and all-cause mortality. Optimal consumption of risk-decreasing foods results in a 56% reduction of all-cause mortality, whereas consumption of risk-increasing foods is associated with a 2-fold increased risk of all-cause mortality.Conclusion: Selecting specific optimal intakes of the investigated food groups can lead to a considerable change in the risk of premature death.

KEYWORDS:

diet; dose response; food groups; meta-analysis; mortality

PMID:
28446499
DOI:
10.3945/ajcn.117.153148
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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