Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Neurosci Methods. 2017 Jun 1;284:47-56. doi: 10.1016/j.jneumeth.2017.04.012. Epub 2017 Apr 23.

Flow cytometry analysis of inflammatory cells isolated from the sciatic nerve and DRG after chronic constriction injury in mice.

Author information

1
Departments of Pain Management and Neurosciences, Lerner Research Institute and Anaesthesiology Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA.
2
Departments of Pain Management and Neurosciences, Lerner Research Institute and Anaesthesiology Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA; Department of Anesthesiology, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, 610041, China.
3
Departments of Pain Management and Neurosciences, Lerner Research Institute and Anaesthesiology Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA. Electronic address: chengj@ccf.org.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Cellular responses to nerve injury play a central role in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. However, the analysis of site specific cellular responses to nerve injury and neuropathic pain is limited to immunohistochemistry staining with numerous limitations.

NEW METHODS:

We proposed to apply flow cytometry to overcome some of the limitations and developed two protocols for isolation of cells from small specimens of the sciatic nerve and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in mice. RESULTS AND COMPARASION WITH EXISTING: methods We found that both the non-enzymatic and enzymatic approaches were highly effective in harvesting a sufficient number of cells for flow cytometry analysis in normal and pathological conditions. The total number of cells in the injury site of the sciatic and its DRGs increased significantly 14days after chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve, compared to sham surgery control or the contralateral control. The enzymatic approach yielded a significantly higher total number of cells and CD45 negative cells, suggesting that this approach allows for harvest of more resident cells, compared to the non-enzymatic method. The percentage of CD45+/CD11b+ cells was significantly increased in the sciatic nerve but not in the DRG. These results were consistent with both protocols.

CONCLUSIONS:

We thus offer two simple and effective protocols that allow for application of flow cytometry to the investigation of cellular and molecular mechanisms of neuropathic pain.

KEYWORDS:

Chronic pain; Dorsal root ganglion (DRG); Enzymatic dissociation; Flow cytometry; Mice; Nerve injury; Neuropathic pain; Non-enzymatic dissociation; Sciatic nerve

PMID:
28445708
DOI:
10.1016/j.jneumeth.2017.04.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center