Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PLoS One. 2017 Apr 26;12(4):e0174848. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0174848. eCollection 2017.

Dietary patterns and all-cause, cancer, and cardiovascular disease mortality in Japanese men and women: The Japan public health center-based prospective study.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Bureau of International Health Cooperation, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
2
Prevention Division, Center for Public Health Sciences, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan.
3
Department of Nutrition Management, Sagami Women's University, Kanagawa, Japan.
4
Faculty of Human Life and Environment, Nara Women's University, Nara, Japan.
5
Department of Diabetes Research, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
6
Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Saitama Medical University, Saitama, Japan.
7
Department of Public Health, Division of Social and Environmental Medicine, Osaka University, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.
8
Epidemiology Division, Center for Public Health Sciences, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan.
9
Center for Public Health Sciences, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

A meta-analysis showed an inverse association of a prudent/healthy dietary pattern with all-cause mortality and no association of a western/unhealthy dietary pattern. However, the association of distinctive dietary patterns of Japanese population with mortality remains unclear. We prospectively investigated the association between dietary patterns and all-cause, cancer, and cardiovascular disease mortality among Japanese adults.

METHODS:

Participants were 36,737 men and 44,983 women aged 45-74 years who participated in the second survey of the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study (1995-1998) and who had no history of serious disease. Dietary patterns were derived from principal component analysis of the consumption of 134 food and beverage items ascertained by a food frequency questionnaire. Hazard ratios of death from the second survey to December 2012 were estimated using cox proportional hazard regression analysis.

RESULTS:

A prudent dietary pattern, which was characterized by high intake of vegetables, fruit, soy products, potatoes, seaweed, mushrooms, and fish, was significantly associated with decreased risk of all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) of all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality for the highest versus lowest quartile of the prudent dietary pattern score were 0.82 (0.77 to 0.86) and 0.72 (0.64 to 0.79), respectively (P for trend <0.001 in both). A Westernized dietary pattern, characterized by high intake of meat, processed meat, bread, and dairy products, was also inversely associated with risk of all-cause, cancer, and cardiovascular disease mortality. A traditional Japanese dietary pattern was not associated with these risks.

CONCLUSIONS:

The prudent and Westernized dietary patterns were associated with a decreased risk of all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality in Japanese adults.

PMID:
28445513
PMCID:
PMC5405917
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0174848
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center