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Pediatr Res. 2017 Aug;82(2):305-316. doi: 10.1038/pr.2017.52. Epub 2017 May 31.

Body composition at birth and its relationship with neonatal anthropometric ratios: the newborn body composition study of the INTERGROWTH-21st project.

Author information

1
Nuffield Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology and Oxford Maternal and Perinatal Health Institute, Green Templeton College, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
2
Department of Community Health Sciences, Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
3
Dipartimento di Scienze Pediatriche e dell'Adolescenza, Cattedra di Neonatologia, Università degli Studi di Torino, Torino, Italy.
4
Programa de Pós-Graduação em Epidemiologia, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil.
5
Department of Paediatrics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
6
Programa de Pós-Graduação em Saúde e Comportamento, Universidade Católica de Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil.
7
Faculty of Health Sciences, Aga Khan University, Nairobi, Kenya.
8
Department of Family and Community Health, Ministry of Health, Muscat, Sultanate of Oman.
9
Centre for Statistics in Medicine, Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
10
Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
11
Global Alliance to Prevent Prematurity and Stillbirth, Seattle, Washington.
12
Nagpur INTERGROWTH-21 Research Centre, Ketkar Hospital, Nagpur, India.
13
School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, China.
14
Division of Paediatrics, School of Medicine, Pontifical Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile.
15
Center of Excellence in Women and Child Health, The Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan.

Abstract

BackgroundWe aimed to describe newborn body composition and identify which anthropometric ratio (weight/length; BMI; or ponderal index, PI) best predicts fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM).MethodsAir-displacement plethysmography (PEA POD) was used to estimate FM, FFM, and body fat percentage (BF%). Associations between FFM, FM, and BF% and weight/length, BMI, and PI were evaluated in 1,019 newborns using multivariate regression analysis. Charts for FM, FFM, and BF% were generated using a prescriptive subsample (n=247). Standards for the best-predicting anthropometric ratio were calculated utilizing the same population used for the INTERGROWTH-21st Newborn Size Standards (n=20,479).ResultsFFM and FM increased consistently during late pregnancy. Differential FM, BF%, and FFM patterns were observed for those born preterm (34+0-36+6 weeks' gestation) and with impaired intrauterine growth. Weight/length by gestational age (GA) was a better predictor of FFM and FM (adjusted R2=0.92 and 0.71, respectively) than BMI or PI, independent of sex, GA, and timing of measurement. Results were almost identical when only preterm newborns were studied. We present sex-specific centiles for weight/length ratio for GA.ConclusionsWeight/length best predicts newborn FFM and FM. There are differential FM, FFM, and BF% patterns by sex, GA, and size at birth.

PMID:
28445454
PMCID:
PMC5605677
DOI:
10.1038/pr.2017.52
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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