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Mol Biol Evol. 2017 Aug 1;34(8):1974-1980. doi: 10.1093/molbev/msx141.

Meiotic Genes Are Enriched in Regions of Reduced Archaic Ancestry.

Author information

1
Inserm U1085-IRSET, Université de Rennes 1, Rennes, France.
2
Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (USPC), Paris, France.
3
EHESP - School of Public Health, Rennes, France.
4
Department of Computer Science, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA.
5
Department of Human Genetics, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA.
6
Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
7
Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, MA.
8
Harvard Medical School, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, MA.

Abstract

About 1-6% of the genetic ancestry of modern humans today originates from admixture with archaic humans. It has recently been shown that autosomal genomic regions with a reduced proportion of Neanderthal and Denisovan ancestries (NA and DA) are significantly enriched in genes that are more expressed in testis than in other tissues. To determine whether a cellular segregation pattern would exist, we combined maps of archaic introgression with a cross-analysis of three transcriptomic datasets deciphering the transcriptional landscape of human gonadal cell types. We reveal that the regions deficient in both NA and DA contain a significant enrichment of genes transcribed in meiotic germ cells. The interbreeding of anatomically modern humans with archaic humans may have introduced archaic-derived alleles that contributed to genetic incompatibilities affecting meiosis that were subsequently purged by natural selection.

KEYWORDS:

archaic hominin admixture; genetic incompatibilities; germ cells; meiosis; testis

PMID:
28444387
PMCID:
PMC5850719
DOI:
10.1093/molbev/msx141
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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