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Curr Alzheimer Res. 2017;14(8):841-849. doi: 10.2174/1567205014666170425112331.

Nutritional Deficiency in Early Life Facilitates Aging-Associated Cognitive Decline.

Author information

1
Chongqing City Key Lab of Translational Medical Research in Cognitive Development and Learning and Memory Disorders, and Ministry of Education Key Lab of Child Development and Disorders, Pediatric Research Institute, China International Science and Technology Cooperation Base of Child Development and Critical Disorders, Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400014, China.
2
ownsend Family Laboratories, Department of Psychiatry, The University of British Columbia, 2255 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada.
3
Department of Neurology, Daping Hospital, Third Military Medical University, 10 Changjiang Branch Road, Yu-Zhong District, Chongqing 400042, China.
4
Epidemiology Research Institute, School of Public Health and Management, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016, China.
5
Department of Neurology, China.
6
Mental Health Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, No. 1 Youyi Road, Chongqing 400016, China.
7
Chongqing City Key Lab of Translational Medical Research in Cognitive Development and Learning and Memory Disorders, and Ministry of Education Key Lab of Child Development and Disorders, Pediatric Research Institute, China.
8
Townsend Family Laboratories, Department of Psychiatry, The University of British Columbia, 2255 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Nutrition is important for the fetal developmental programming. Nutritional deficiency in early life could increase the susceptibility to many aging-related disorders including cognitive decline.

OBJECTIVE:

Our study aims to investigate the effect of early famine exposure on aging-associated cognitive function.

METHODS:

We recruited 6790 subjects born between 1956 to 1964 during which the Great Chinese Famine occurred (1959-1961). Cognitive function of these subjects were evaluated using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Activities of Daily Living scale (ADL), the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale (IADL) and the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR).

RESULTS:

Our study identified that early exposure to the famine significantly increased the risk of cognitive impairments in later life, leading to higher prevalence of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and dementia. We also found the sex and rural-urban differences in this malnutrition-induced effect. Illiteracy, history of stroke or diabetes mellitus are great risk factors to facilitate the cognitive decline.

CONCLUSION:

These findings demonstrate that exposure to famine during early life including prenatal period and early childhood facilitates aging-associated cognitive deficits.

KEYWORDS:

Famine; dementia; early life; malnutrition; mild cognitive impairment; risk factor

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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