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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2017 Apr 24. doi: 10.1002/oby.21852. [Epub ahead of print]

Chronic intestinal electrical stimulation improves glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in diet-induced obesity rats.

Li S1,2, Zhu W1,3, Zhang S1,4, Chen JD1,2.

Author information

1
Veterans Research and Education Foundation, VA Medical Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA.
2
Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
3
Department of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Jiangsu Province Hospital, Nanjing, China.
4
Department of Gastroenterology, Tianjin No. 254 Hospital, Tianjin, China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Obesity is a contributing factor to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to study the therapeutic potential of intestinal electrical stimulation (IES) for obesity and associated glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in diet-induced obesity (DIO) rats.

METHODS:

DIO rats were divided into two groups to receive sham or IES for 8 weeks. Oral glucose tolerance and insulin tolerance tests were performed. Gastric emptying and small bowel transit tests were performed. Blood samples were collected for the analysis of insulin and free fatty acid (FFA).

RESULTS:

Chronic IES reduced food intake and body weight and decreased the adiposity index in DIO rats. Compared with chow-fed rats, DIO rats had an elevated fasting plasma glucose level, impaired glucose tolerance, and impaired insulin sensitivity, which were improved after chronic IES. FFA was elevated in DIO rats and suppressed with IES. Chronic IES delayed gastric emptying but accelerated small bowel transit.

CONCLUSIONS:

IES reduces food intake and body weight and improves glucose tolerance and insulin resistance in DIO rats. The ameliorating effect on glycemic control may be due to the weight loss and suppression of plasma FFA. Other mechanisms such as the modulation of gastrointestinal transit may also be involved.

PMID:
28437585
DOI:
10.1002/oby.21852
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