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Psychiatr Q. 2018 Mar;89(1):53-60. doi: 10.1007/s11126-017-9514-y.

Elevated Plasma S100B, Psychotic Symptoms, and Cognition in Schizophrenia.

Author information

1
Harris County Psychiatric Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, 2800 South MacGregor Way, Houston, TX, 77021, USA.
2
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, USA.
3
Menninger Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.
4
Harris County Psychiatric Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, 2800 South MacGregor Way, Houston, TX, 77021, USA. Olaoluwa.O.Okusaga@uth.tmc.edu.
5
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, USA. Olaoluwa.O.Okusaga@uth.tmc.edu.

Abstract

S100B is a calcium binding protein mainly produced by glial cells. Previous studies have shown elevated levels of S100B in patients with schizophrenia. We measured S100B levels in fasting plasma of 39 patients with schizophrenia and 19 adult healthy controls. We used linear regression to compare S100B between patients and controls. In patients only, we also investigated the relationship between S100B levels and psychotic symptoms (assessed by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale), and cognitive function (assessed by the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery), respectively by calculating Pearson's correlation coefficients. Mean plasma S100B was significantly higher in the patient group than in the control group. There were no significant correlations between plasma S100B and psychotic symptoms or cognition.

KEYWORDS:

Cognition; NIH toolbox cognition battery; Psychotic symptoms; S100B; Schizophrenia

PMID:
28435992
DOI:
10.1007/s11126-017-9514-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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