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Complement Ther Med. 2017 Apr;31:53-58. doi: 10.1016/j.ctim.2017.02.001. Epub 2017 Feb 5.

Factors associated with complementary medicine use in pediatric musculoskeletal conditions: Results from a national survey.

Author information

1
Division of Immunology, Boston Children's Hospital, 300 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA, 02115, United States. Electronic address: ezra.cohen@childrens.harvard.edu.
2
Benson-Henry Institute for Mind-Body Medicine and Division of General Medicine, 151 Merrimac St, Boston, MA, 02114, United States; Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit St, Boston, MA, 02114, United States. Electronic address: mdossett@mgh.harvard.edu.
3
Benson-Henry Institute for Mind-Body Medicine and Division of General Medicine, 151 Merrimac St, Boston, MA, 02114, United States; Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit St, Boston, MA, 02114, United States. Electronic address: dmehta@mgh.harvard.edu.
4
Division of General Internal Medicine and Primary Care, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Ave, Boston, MA, 02115, United States. Electronic address: rdavis@bidmc.harvard.edu.
5
Department of Rheumatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA, 02115, United States. Electronic address: ylee9@partners.org.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is common in children, but its use has only been investigated in children with musculoskeletal conditions (MSK) to a limited extent. We aimed to characterize factors associated with CAM use in children with MSK conditions.

METHODS:

Within the 2012 National Health Interview Survey dataset (including its child CAM supplement), we examined factors associated with CAM use in children with MSK conditions and performed an analysis examining the perceived usefulness of CAM therapies for MSK conditions.

RESULTS:

Overall, there were 10,218 children in the dataset. 28.0% of children with MSK conditions used CAM, compared to 8.8% of children without MSK conditions. Gender (p=0.003), region (p=0.001), race (p=0.001), parental CAM use (p<0.001), education (<0.001), and having anxiety, stress or depression (p=0.030) were correlated with CAM use. Among 90 children who reported on CAM use, 89.7% said that CAM helped some or a great deal for their MSK condition.

CONCLUSIONS:

Several factors, particularly parental education and parental CAM use, were associated with CAM use, and self-reported improvement rates were high. Interventional trials are needed to determine the efficacy of specific CAM therapies for treating different MSK conditions in children.

KEYWORDS:

Complementary and alternative medicine; Integrative medicine; Musculoskeletal diseases; Pediatrics; Rheumatology

PMID:
28434471
PMCID:
PMC5407415
DOI:
10.1016/j.ctim.2017.02.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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