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Curr Diab Rep. 2017 Jun;17(6):39. doi: 10.1007/s11892-017-0870-7.

Peer Coaching Interventions for Parents of Children with Type 1 Diabetes.

Author information

1
Center for Translational Science, Children's National Medical Center, 111 N. Michigan Avenue NW, Washington, DC, 20010, USA. ctully1@childrensnational.org.
2
Center for Translational Science, Children's National Medical Center, 111 N. Michigan Avenue NW, Washington, DC, 20010, USA.
3
School of Medicine & Health Sciences, George Washington University, 2300 Eye Street NW, Washington, DC, 20037, USA.
4
Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital, 1102 Bates Ave, Suite 940, Houston, TX, 77030, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

Peer support is a promising model of providing psychosocial support to parents of children with type 1 diabetes. This review seeks to discuss the findings of the existing literature in peer coaching as it relates to parents and diabetes as well as to identify gaps in knowledge for future intervention development and implementation.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Peer support programs vary widely with regard to recruitment, training, and delivery protocols. Across most programs, ongoing support and supervision are provided to peer coaches. Despite inconsistent effects on psychosocial and child health outcomes, parent coaching is consistently a highly acceptable and feasible intervention with parents of children with T1D. Current evidence supports use of parent coaching as part of a multicomponent intervention or program to increase patient satisfaction, but more research is needed to determine if it can stand alone as an active mechanism for behavior change. The use of peer coach interventions for parents of young children with diabetes is feasible to implement and highly acceptable. However, more research is needed to understand the enduring impact for target parents and peer coaches alike, as well as impact on child outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

Child; Diabetes; Parent coach; Parents; Peer mentor; Psychosocial

PMID:
28434144
PMCID:
PMC5630452
DOI:
10.1007/s11892-017-0870-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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