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Brain Behav Immun. 2017 Aug;64:266-275. doi: 10.1016/j.bbi.2017.04.013. Epub 2017 Apr 20.

Hypoxia augments LPS-induced inflammation and triggers high altitude cerebral edema in mice.

Author information

1
Department of Cognitive Sciences, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Beijing, China. Electronic address: whuzhouyanzhao@163.com.
2
Department of Cognitive Sciences, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Beijing, China. Electronic address: huangxin1010@163.com.
3
Department of Cognitive Sciences, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Beijing, China. Electronic address: zhaotongj@sohu.com.
4
Department of Cognitive Sciences, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Beijing, China. Electronic address: qiaomeng0730@163.com.
5
Department of Cognitive Sciences, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Beijing, China. Electronic address: 1360824558@qq.com.
6
Department of Cognitive Sciences, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Beijing, China. Electronic address: zhaoming1981@163.com.
7
Department of Cognitive Sciences, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Beijing, China. Electronic address: lunlunxu@163.com.
8
Department of Cognitive Sciences, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Beijing, China. Electronic address: zhaoyq777@163.com.
9
Department of Cognitive Sciences, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Beijing, China. Electronic address: wuliying985@hotmail.com.
10
Department of Cognitive Sciences, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Beijing, China. Electronic address: ammswu@sina.com.
11
School of Pharmacy, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG, UK. Electronic address: r.chen@keele.ac.uk.
12
Department of Cognitive Sciences, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Beijing, China; Co-Innovation Center of Neuroregeneration, Nantong University, Nantong, China; Beijing Institute for Brain Disorder, Beijing, China. Electronic address: fanming@nic.bmi.ac.cn.
13
Department of Cognitive Sciences, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Beijing, China; Co-Innovation Center of Neuroregeneration, Nantong University, Nantong, China. Electronic address: linglingzhu@hotmail.com.

Abstract

High altitude cerebral edema (HACE) is a life-threatening illness that develops during the rapid ascent to high altitudes, but its underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Growing evidence has implicated inflammation in the susceptibility to and development of brain edema. In the present study, we investigated the inflammatory response and its roles in HACE in mice following high altitude hypoxic injury. We report that acute hypobaric hypoxia induced a slight inflammatory response or brain edema within 24h in mice. However, the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced systemic inflammatory response rapidly aggravated brain edema upon acute hypobaric hypoxia exposure by disrupting blood-brain barrier integrity and activating microglia, increasing water permeability via the accumulation of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), and eventually leading to impaired cognitive and motor function. These findings demonstrate that hypoxia augments LPS-induced inflammation and induces the occurrence and development of cerebral edema in mice at high altitude. Here, we provide new information on the impact of systemic inflammation on the susceptibility to and outcomes of HACE.

KEYWORDS:

Blood-brain barrier (BBB); High altitude cerebral edema (HACE); Inflammation; Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)

PMID:
28433745
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbi.2017.04.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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