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Lancet Infect Dis. 2017 Jul;17(7):e197-e208. doi: 10.1016/S1473-3099(17)30229-3. Epub 2017 Apr 19.

Maternal immunisation: collaborating with mother nature.

Author information

1
Institute for Medical Immunology, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium. Electronic address: arnaud.marchant@ulb.ac.be.
2
Oxford Vaccine Group, Department of Paediatrics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia and BC Children's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada; Vaccine Evaluation Center, University of British Columbia and BC Children's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
3
Vaccine Evaluation Center, University of British Columbia and BC Children's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada; Vaccine and Immunity Theme, Medical Research Council Unit, Fajara, The Gambia.
4
Institute for Medical Immunology, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium; Department of Infectious Diseases, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Saint-Pierre, Brussels, Belgium.
5
Faculty of Molecular Science, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia.
6
University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.
7
Vaccine Evaluation Center, University of British Columbia and BC Children's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
8
Paediatric Infectious Diseases Research Group, Institute of Infection and Immunity, St George's, University of London, London, UK.
9
Canadian Center for Vaccinology, Dalhousie University, Izaak Walton Killam Health Centre, and Nova Scotia Health Authority, Halifax, NS, Canada.
10
Vanderbilt Vaccine Research Program, Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA.
11
St George's Vaccine Institute, Institute of Infection and Immunity, St George's, University of London, London, UK.
12
Respiratory Medicine, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, UK.
13
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia and BC Children's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada; Vaccine Evaluation Center, University of British Columbia and BC Children's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
14
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia and BC Children's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada; Vaccine Evaluation Center, University of British Columbia and BC Children's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada. Electronic address: tkollm@mac.com.

Abstract

Maternal immunisation has the potential to substantially reduce morbidity and mortality from infectious diseases after birth. The success of tetanus, influenza, and pertussis immunisation during pregnancy has led to consideration of additional maternal immunisation strategies to prevent group B streptococcus and respiratory syncytial virus infections, among others. However, many gaps in knowledge regarding the immunobiology of maternal immunisation prevent the optimal design and application of this successful public health intervention. Therefore, we did an innovative landscape analysis to identify research priorities. Key topics were delineated through review of the published literature, consultation with vaccine developers and regulatory agencies, and a collaborative workshop that gathered experts across several maternal immunisation initiatives-group B streptococcus, respiratory syncytial virus, pertussis, and influenza. Finally, a global online survey prioritised the identified knowledge gaps on the basis of expert opinion about their importance and relevance. Here we present the results of this worldwide landscape analysis and discuss the identified research gaps.

PMID:
28433705
DOI:
10.1016/S1473-3099(17)30229-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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