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J Youth Adolesc. 2018 Feb;47(2):290-305. doi: 10.1007/s10964-017-0673-9. Epub 2017 Apr 21.

Individual Differences in Adolescents' Emotional Reactivity across Relationship Contexts.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Rhode Island College, 600 Mount Pleasant Ave., Providence, RI, 02908, USA. ecook@ric.edu.
2
Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, 32306, USA.
3
Department of Human Development and Family Studies, University of North Carolina - Greensboro, Greensboro, NC, USA.

Abstract

Understanding individual differences in adolescents' ability to regulate emotions within interpersonal relationships is paramount for healthy development. Thus, the effect of individual vulnerabilities (depressive affect, social anxiety, self-blame, and coping efficacy problems) on the transmission of emotional reactivity in response to conflict from family to peers (friends and romantic partners) was prospectively examined across six waves of data in a community-based sample of 416 adolescents (Mage Wave 1 = 11.90, 51% girls). Multiple-group models estimated in structural equation modeling suggested that youth who were higher in social anxiety or coping efficacy problems were more likely to transmit emotional reactivity developed in the family-of-origin to emotional reactivity in response to conflict in close friendships. Additionally, those youth higher in self-blame and depressive affect were more likely to transmit emotional reactivity from friendships to romantic relationships.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescence; Emotional reactivity; Family; Individual vulnerabilities; Peer relationships

PMID:
28432534
DOI:
10.1007/s10964-017-0673-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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