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Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci. 2017 Sep 1;12(9):1534-1544. doi: 10.1093/scan/nsx062.

Identifying new susceptibility genes on dopaminergic and serotonergic pathways for the framing effect in decision-making.

Gao X1,2, Liu J3,4, Gong P5, Wang J6, Fang W7,8, Yan H7,8, Zhu L1,7,9, Zhou X1,2,9,10,11.

Author information

1
Center for Brain and Cognitive Sciences.
2
School of Psychological and Cognitive Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China.
3
China Center for Special Economic Zone Research.
4
Research Centre for Brain Function and Psychological Science, Shenzhen University, Guangdong 518060, China.
5
Key Laboratory of Resource Biology and Biotechnology in Western China (Ministry of Education), Northwest University, Shaanxi 710069, China.
6
Research Institute of Educational Technology, South China Normal University, Guangdong 510631, China.
7
Peking-Tsinghua Center for Life Sciences.
8
School of Life Sciences.
9
PKU-IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research.
10
Key Laboratory of Machine Perception (Ministry of Education).
11
Beijing Key Laboratory of Behavior and Mental Health, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China.

Abstract

The framing effect refers the tendency to be risk-averse when options are presented positively but be risk-seeking when the same options are presented negatively during decision-making. This effect has been found to be modulated by the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) and the catechol-o-methyltransferase gene (COMT) polymorphisms, which are on the dopaminergic and serotonergic pathways and which are associated with affective processing. The current study aimed to identify new genetic variations of genes on dopaminergic and serotonergic pathways that may contribute to individual differences in the susceptibility to framing. Using genome-wide association data and the gene-based principal components regression method, we examined genetic variations of 26 genes on the pathways in 1317 Chinese Han participants. Consistent with previous studies, we found that the genetic variations of the SLC6A4 gene and the COMT gene were associated with the framing effect. More importantly, we demonstrated that the genetic variations of the aromatic-L-amino-acid decarboxylase (DDC) gene, which is involved in the synthesis of both dopamine and serotonin, contributed to individual differences in the susceptibility to framing. Our findings shed light on the understanding of the genetic basis of affective decision-making.

KEYWORDS:

COMT; DDC; GWAS; SLC6A4; decision-making; framing effect

PMID:
28431168
PMCID:
PMC5629826
DOI:
10.1093/scan/nsx062
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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