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Tech Coloproctol. 2017 Apr;21(4):277-286. doi: 10.1007/s10151-017-1613-0. Epub 2017 Apr 20.

Long-term outcome of sacral neuromodulation for chronic refractory constipation.

Author information

1
Sir Alan Parks Physiology Unit, St. Mark's Hospital, Harrow, UK. yazmaeda@gmail.com.
2
Imperial College, London, UK. yazmaeda@gmail.com.
3
Imperial College, London, UK.
4
Department of Gastroenterology, St. Vincent Hospital Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
5
University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
6
Sir Alan Parks Physiology Unit, St. Mark's Hospital, Harrow, UK.
7
Chirurgische Klinik mit Poliklinik der Friedrich Alexander, Universität Erlangen/Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany.
8
Department of Surgery, Danderyd Hospital, Danderyd, Sweden.
9
Vienna Private Clinic, Vienna, Austria.
10
Department of Surgery, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
11
Department of Surgery P, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Sacral neuromodulation has been reported as a treatment for severe idiopathic constipation. This study aimed to evaluate the long-term effects of sacral neuromodulation by following patients who participated in a prospective, open-label, multicentre study up to 5 years.

METHODS:

Patients were followed up at 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48 and 60 months. Symptoms and quality of life were assessed using bowel diary, the Cleveland Clinic constipation score and the Short Form-36 quality-of-life scale.

RESULTS:

Sixty-two patients (7 male, median age 40 years) underwent test stimulation, and 45 proceeded to permanent implantation. Twenty-seven patients exited the study (7 withdrawn consent, 7 loss of efficacy, 6 site-specific reasons, 4 withdrew other reasons, 2 lost to follow-up, 1 prior to follow-up). Eighteen patients (29%) attended 60-month follow-up. In 10 patients who submitted bowel diary, their improvement of symptoms was sustained: the number of defecations per week (4.1 ± 3.7 vs 8.1 ± 3.4, mean ± standard deviation, p < 0.001, baseline vs 60 months) and sensation of incomplete emptying (0.8 ± 0.3 vs 0.2 ± 0.1, p = 0.002). In 14 patients (23%) with Cleveland Clinic constipation score, improvement was sustained at 60 months [17.9 ± 4.4 (baseline) to 10.4 ± 4.1, p < 0.001]. Some 103 device-related adverse events were reported in 27 (61%).

CONCLUSION:

Benefit from sacral neuromodulation in the long-term was observed in a small minority of patients with intractable constipation. The results should be interpreted with caution given the high dropout and complication rate during the follow-up period.

KEYWORDS:

Constipation; Sacral nerve stimulation; Sacral neuromodulation

PMID:
28429130
PMCID:
PMC5423992
DOI:
10.1007/s10151-017-1613-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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