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Science. 2017 Apr 21;356(6335):315-319. doi: 10.1126/science.aag2029.

Neonatal acquisition of Clostridia species protects against colonization by bacterial pathogens.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. gabriel.nunez@umich.edu yungikim77@gmail.com.
2
Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.
3
Department of Pathology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.
4
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.
5
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.
6
Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.
7
Department of Pathology and Committee on Immunology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA.
8
Institute for Advanced Biosciences, Keio University, Yamagata, Japan.
9
PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012, Japan.

Abstract

The high susceptibility of neonates to infections has been assumed to be due to immaturity of the immune system, but the mechanism remains unclear. By colonizing adult germ-free mice with the cecal contents of neonatal and adult mice, we show that the neonatal microbiota is unable to prevent colonization by two bacterial pathogens that cause mortality in neonates. The lack of colonization resistance occurred when Clostridiales were absent in the neonatal microbiota. Administration of Clostridiales, but not Bacteroidales, protected neonatal mice from pathogen infection and abrogated intestinal pathology upon pathogen challenge. Depletion of Clostridiales also abolished colonization resistance in adult mice. The neonatal bacteria enhanced the ability of protective Clostridiales to colonize the gut.

PMID:
28428425
PMCID:
PMC6082366
DOI:
10.1126/science.aag2029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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