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Genes Dev. 2017 Apr 1;31(7):634-638. doi: 10.1101/gad.297150.117. Epub 2017 Apr 20.

Uncoupling neurogenic gene networks in the Drosophila embryo.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Biology, Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544, USA.
2
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544, USA.

Abstract

The EGF signaling pathway specifies neuronal identities in the Drosophila embryo by regulating developmental patterning genes such as intermediate neuroblasts defective (ind). EGFR is activated in the ventral midline and neurogenic ectoderm by the Spitz ligand, which is processed by the Rhomboid protease. CRISPR/Cas9 was used to delete defined rhomboid enhancers mediating expression at each site of Spitz processing. Surprisingly, the neurogenic ectoderm, not the ventral midline, was found to be the dominant source of EGF patterning activity. We suggest that Drosophila is undergoing an evolutionary transition in central nervous system (CNS)-organizing activity from the ventral midline to the neurogenic ectoderm.

KEYWORDS:

Drosophila embryo; EGFR regulatory networks; central nervous system; intermediate neuroblasts defective; rhomboid

PMID:
28428262
PMCID:
PMC5411704
DOI:
10.1101/gad.297150.117
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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