Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neuropsychologia. 2017 Jul 1;101:57-64. doi: 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.04.022. Epub 2017 Apr 17.

Egocentric and allocentric visuospatial working memory in premotor Huntington's disease: A double dissociation with caudate and hippocampal volumes.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA; Hellman Family Foundation Alzheimer's Disease Research Program, San Francisco, California, USA. Electronic address: Katherine.Possin@ucsf.edu.
2
Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, USA.
3
Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA.
4
Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA.
5
Hellman Family Foundation Alzheimer's Disease Research Program, San Francisco, California, USA; Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease, San Francisco, CA, USA; Departments of Neurology and Physiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA; Keck Program in Brain Cell Engineering, Gladstone Institutes, San Francisco, CA, USA; Taube/Koret Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research, San Francisco, CA, USA; Roddenberry Stem Cell Program, San Francisco, CA, USA.
6
Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA; Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, USA.

Abstract

Our brains represent spatial information in egocentric (self-based) or allocentric (landmark-based) coordinates. Rodent studies have demonstrated a critical role for the caudate in egocentric navigation and the hippocampus in allocentric navigation. We administered tests of egocentric and allocentric working memory to individuals with premotor Huntington's disease (pmHD), which is associated with early caudate nucleus atrophy, and controls. Each test had 80 trials during which subjects were asked to remember 2 locations over 1-sec delays. The only difference between these otherwise identical tests was that locations could only be coded in self-based or landmark-based coordinates. We applied a multiatlas-based segmentation algorithm and computed point-wise Jacobian determinants to measure regional variations in caudate and hippocampal volumes from 3T MRI. As predicted, the pmHD patients were significantly more impaired on egocentric working memory. Only egocentric accuracy correlated with caudate volumes, specifically the dorsolateral caudate head, right more than left, a region that receives dense efferents from dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. In contrast, only allocentric accuracy correlated with hippocampal volumes, specifically intermediate and posterior regions that connect strongly with parahippocampal and posterior parietal cortices. These results indicate that the distinction between egocentric and allocentric navigation applies to working memory. The dorsolateral caudate is important for egocentric working memory, which can explain the disproportionate impairment in pmHD. Allocentric working memory, in contrast, relies on the hippocampus and is relatively spared in pmHD.

KEYWORDS:

Caudate; Navigation; Visuospatial; Working memory

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center