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Pediatr Res. 2017 Apr 20. doi: 10.1038/pr.2017.112. [Epub ahead of print]

Association of prenatal urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations and childhood bmi and obesity.

Author information

1
Center for Environmental Research and Children's Health (CERCH), School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA.
2
Department of Environmental Health, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
3
Division of Laboratory Sciences, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although experiments in animals suggest phthalates may have obesogenic effects, studies of prenatal exposure in children show inconsistent results.

METHODS:

We measured urinary concentrations of 11 phthalate metabolites collected twice during pregnancy from mothers in the Center for the Health Assessment of Mothers and Children of Salinas (CHAMACOS) cohort study (N=345). Height, weight, waist circumference, and percent body fat were assessed in their children between 5 and 12 years of age. We used generalized estimating equations to examine associations at each age and tested for interaction by sex.

RESULTS:

Metabolites of diethyl phthalate (DEP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), butyl benzyl phthalate, and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) were positively associated with body mass index z-score, waist circumference z-score, and percent body fat at multiple ages. At age 12, we observed increased odds of being overweight/obese with each doubling of prenatal concentrations of DEP (OR=1.3; 95% CI: 1.1, 1.4), DBP (1.2; 1.0, 1.4), and DEHP (1.3; 1.0, 1.6) metabolites. Results were similar in boys and girls except for DBP metabolites and the non-specific metabolite mono-(3-carboxypropyl) phthalate, which showed positive associations only in boys.

CONCLUSIONS:

In utero exposure to certain phthalates is associated with increased BMI and risk of overweight/obesity in childhood.Pediatric Research accepted article preview online, 20 April 2017. doi:10.1038/pr.2017.112.

PMID:
28426647
DOI:
10.1038/pr.2017.112
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