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Ann Behav Med. 2017 Dec;51(6):822-832. doi: 10.1007/s12160-017-9905-1.

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms and Problematic Overeating Behaviors in Young Men and Women.

Author information

1
Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota School of Public Health, 1300 South 2nd Street, 3rd Floor, Minneapolis, MN, 55454, USA. smmason@umn.edu.
2
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. smmason@umn.edu.
3
Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
4
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
5
Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
6
Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
7
Department of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
8
Department of Psychology, Smith College, Northampton, MA, USA.
9
Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
10
Powell Center for Women's Health, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
11
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
12
Connors Center for Women's Health and Gender Biology, Brigham and Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a risk factor for obesity, but the range of behaviors that contribute to this association are not known.

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to examine associations between self-reported PTSD symptoms in 2007, with and without comorbid depression symptoms, and three problematic overeating behaviors in 2010, and to estimate the associations of PTSD-related overeating behaviors with obesity.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses included 7438 male (n = 2478) and female (n = 4960) participants from the Growing Up Today Study (mean age 22-29 years in 2010). Three eating behavior outcomes were assessed: binge eating (eating a large amount of food in a short period of time with loss of control), top quartile of coping-motivated eating (from the Motivations to Eat scale), and top quartile of disinhibited eating (from the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire).

RESULTS:

PTSD symptoms were associated with two- to threefold increases in binge eating and top-quartile coping-motivated eating; having ≥4 PTSD symptoms, relative to no PTSD symptoms, was associated with covariate-adjusted RRs of 2.7 (95% CI 2.1, 3.4) for binge eating, 2.1 (95% CI 1.9, 2.4) for the top quartile of coping-motivated eating, and 1.5 (95% CI 1.3, 1.7) for the top quartile of disinhibited eating. There was a trend toward PTSD symptoms in 2007 predicting new onset binge eating in 2010. Having depression symptoms comorbid with PTSD symptoms further increased risk of binge eating and coping-motivated eating. All eating behaviors were associated with obesity.

CONCLUSION:

Clinicians treating patients with PTSD should know of potential comorbid problematic eating behaviors that may contribute to obesity.

KEYWORDS:

Binge eating; Depression; Eating behavior; Obesity; Posttraumatic stress disorder

PMID:
28425019
PMCID:
PMC5648630
[Available on 2018-12-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s12160-017-9905-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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