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Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2017 Mar 2;12:765-772. doi: 10.2147/COPD.S126233. eCollection 2017.

Decreased levels of irisin, a skeletal muscle cell-derived myokine, are related to emphysema associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Author information

1
Department of Respiratory Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka City University, Osaka, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Cigarette smoking-induced oxidant-antioxidant imbalance is a factor that contributes to the pathogenesis of COPD through epithelial cell apoptosis. Irisin is a skeletal muscle cell-derived myokine associated with physical activity. Irisin is also known to decrease oxidant-induced apoptosis in patients with diabetes mellitus. However, the correlation between irisin and emphysema in COPD and its role in epithelial cell apoptosis remains unknown.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

Forty patients with COPD were enrolled in this study. Pulmonary function tests and measurements of the percentage of low-attenuation area on high-resolution computed tomography images were performed, and the results were evaluated for correlation with serum irisin levels. The effect of irisin on cigarette-smoke extract-induced A549 cell apoptosis and the expression of Nrf2, a transcription factor for antioxidants, was also examined in vitro.

RESULTS:

Serum irisin levels were significantly correlated with lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide divided by alveolar volume (r=0.56, P<0.01) and percentage of low-attenuation area (r=-0.79, P<0.01). Moreover, irisin significantly enhanced Nrf2 expression (P<0.05) and reduced cigarette-smoke extract-induced A549 cell apoptosis (P<0.05).

CONCLUSION:

Decreased serum irisin levels are related to emphysema in patients with COPD and involved in epithelial apoptosis, resulting in emphysema. Irisin could be a novel treatment for emphysema in patients with COPD.

KEYWORDS:

COPD; CSE; Nrf2; apoptosis; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; cigarette-smoke extract; emphysema; irisin

PMID:
28424548
PMCID:
PMC5344413
DOI:
10.2147/COPD.S126233
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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