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Biosci Rep. 2017 Apr 19. pii: BSR20170286. doi: 10.1042/BSR20170286. [Epub ahead of print]

Dietary capsaicin and its anti-obesity potency: From mechanism to clinical implications.

Author information

1
Department of Endocrinology, Key Laboratory of Endocrinology, Ministry of Health, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Diabetes Research Center of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, Massachusetts, 100730, China.
2
Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China.
3
Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing, Massachusetts, 100730, China.
4
Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing, China xiaoxh2014@vip.163.com.

Abstract

Obesity is a growing public health problem, which has now been considered as a pandemic non-communicable disease. However, the efficacy of several approaches for weight loss is limited and variable. Thus, alternative anti-obesity treatments are urgently warranted, which should be effective, safe and widely available. Active compounds isolated from herbs are similar with the practice of Traditional Chinese Medicine, which has a holistic approach that can targets to several organs and tissues in the whole body. Capsaicin, a major active compound from chili peppers, has been clearly demonstrated for its numerous beneficial roles in health. In this review, we will focus on the a less highlighted aspect, in particular how dietary chili peppers and capsaicin consumption reduce body weight and its potential mechanisms of its anti-obesity effects. With the widespread pandemic of overweight and obesity, the development of more strategies for the treatment of obesity is urgent. Therefore, a better understanding of the role and mechanism of dietary capsaicin consumption and metabolic health can provide critical implications for the early prevention and treatment of obesity.

KEYWORDS:

Capsaicin; TRPV1; adipogenesis; appetite; obesity; rown adipose tissue

PMID:
28424369
DOI:
10.1042/BSR20170286
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