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Am J Clin Nutr. 2017 Jun;105(6):1314-1326. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.116.151241. Epub 2017 Apr 19.

Circulating concentrations of biomarkers and metabolites related to vitamin status, one-carbon and the kynurenine pathways in US, Nordic, Asian, and Australian populations.

Author information

1
Bevital AS, Bergen, Norway; nkjbm@uib.no.
2
Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
3
Bevital AS, Bergen, Norway.
4
Genetic Epidemiology Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
5
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
6
Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN.
7
Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.
8
Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA.
9
Health Promotion Sciences, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.
10
Cancer Epidemiology Center, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
11
Center for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
12
International Epidemiology Institute, Rockville, MD.
13
Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology, and.
14
Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical Chemistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
15
Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.
16
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD.
17
Nord-Trøndelag Health Study Research Center, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway.
18
Divisions of Preventive Medicine and.
19
Aging, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA.
20
Departments of Epidemiology and.
21
VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA.
22
Human Genetics Foundation, Turin, Italy.
23
Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (U1018 French National Institute of Health and Medical Research), Facultés de Médecine Université Paris-Sud, Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Université Paris-Saclay, Villejuif, France.
24
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
25
Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
26
Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY.
27
Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI.
28
Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA.
29
Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.
30
Duke-National University of Singapore (NSU) Medical School, Singapore, and Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, NSU, Singapore, Singapore.
31
Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China.
32
Department of clinical sciences Malmö, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
33
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Center, School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
34
Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle, United Kingdom.
35
Medical Research Council Integrative Epidemiology Unit, School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom; and.
36
Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.

Abstract

Background: Circulating concentrations of biomarkers that are related to vitamin status vary by factors such as diet, fortification, and supplement use. Published biomarker concentrations have also been influenced by the variation across laboratories, which complicates a comparison of results from different studies.Objective: We robustly and comprehensively assessed differences in biomarkers that are related to vitamin status across geographic regions.Design: The trial was a cross-sectional study in which we investigated 38 biomarkers that are related to vitamin status and one-carbon and tryptophan metabolism in serum and plasma from 5314 healthy control subjects representing 20 cohorts recruited from the United States, Nordic countries, Asia, and Australia, participating in the Lung Cancer Cohort Consortium. All samples were analyzed in a centralized laboratory.Results: Circulating concentrations of riboflavin, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, folate, vitamin B-12, all-trans retinol, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and α-tocopherol as well as combined vitamin scores that were based on these nutrients showed that the general B-vitamin concentration was highest in the United States and that the B vitamins and lipid soluble vitamins were low in Asians. Conversely, circulating concentrations of metabolites that are inversely related to B vitamins involved in the one-carbon and kynurenine pathways were high in Asians. The high B-vitamin concentration in the United States appears to be driven mainly by multivitamin-supplement users.Conclusions: The observed differences likely reflect the variation in intake of vitamins and, in particular, the widespread multivitamin-supplement use in the United States. The results provide valuable information about the differences in biomarker concentrations in populations across continents.

KEYWORDS:

Lung Cancer Cohort Consortium; biomarker; one-carbon metabolism; tryptophan metabolism; vitamin status

PMID:
28424186
PMCID:
PMC5445679
DOI:
10.3945/ajcn.116.151241
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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