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PLoS One. 2017 Apr 19;12(4):e0176143. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0176143. eCollection 2017.

Association of body mass index with clinical outcomes for in-hospital cardiac arrest adult patients following extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

Author information

1
Department of Critical Care Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
3
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
4
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Obesity might be associated with disturbance of cannulation in situation of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR). However, limited data are available on obesity in the setting of ECPR. Therefore, we investigated the association between body mass index (BMI) and clinical outcome in patients underwent ECPR.

METHODS:

From January 2004 to December 2013, in-hospital cardiac arrest patients who had ECPR were enrolled from a single-center registry. We divided patients into four group according to BMI defined with the WHO classification (underweight, BMI < 18.5, n = 14; normal weight, BMI = 18.5-24.9, n = 118; overweight, BMI = 25.0-29.9, n = 53; obese, BMI ≥ 30, n = 15). The primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge.

RESULTS:

Analysis was carried out for a total of 200 adult patients (39.5% females). Their median BMI was 23.20 (interquartile range, 20.93-25.80). The rate of survival to hospital discharge was 31.0%. There was no significant difference in survival to hospital discharge among the four groups (underweight, 35.7%; normal, 31.4%; overweight, 30.2%; obese, 26.7%, p = 0.958). Neurologic outcomes (p = 0.85) and procedural complications (p = 0.40) were not significantly different among the four groups either. SOFA score, initial arrest rhythm, and CPR to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) pump on time were significant predictors for survival to discharge, but not BMI.

CONCLUSION:

BMI was not associated with in-hospital mortality who underwent ECPR. Neurologic outcomes at discharge or procedural complications following ECPR were not related with BMI either.

PMID:
28423065
PMCID:
PMC5397044
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0176143
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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