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PLoS One. 2017 Apr 19;12(4):e0175298. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0175298. eCollection 2017.

Sleep duration and quality in relation to chronic kidney disease and glomerular hyperfiltration in healthy men and women.

Kim CW1, Chang Y1,2,3, Sung E1,4, Yun KE1, Jung HS1, Ko BJ1, Kwon MJ1,5, Hyun YY6, Lee KB6, Kim H6, Shin H1,4, Ryu S1,2,3.

Author information

1
Center for Cohort Studies, Total Healthcare Center, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Clinical Research Design & Evaluation, SAIHST, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
4
Department of Family Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
5
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
6
Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

It is unclear whether sleep duration and quality are associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and glomerular hyperfiltration. The aim of this study was to examine the association of sleep duration and quality with CKD and glomerular hyperfiltration in young and middle-aged adults.

METHODS:

We conducted a cross-sectional study of men and women who underwent a health checkup examination, including assessment of sleep duration and quality (n = 241,607). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m2, and glomerular hyperfiltration was defined as eGFR above the age-/sex-specific 95th percentile.

RESULTS:

In a multinomial logistic regression analysis adjusting for relevant confounders, the adjusted prevalence ratios for CKD (95% confidence interval) comparing sleep durations of ≤ 5, 6, 8, and 9 hours with 7 hours were 1.22 (0.95-1.55), 0.93 (0.75-1.14), 0.97 (0.75-1.26), and 1.56 (1.06-2.30) in men and 0.98 (0.68-1.43), 1.03 (0.72-1.46), 1.39 (0.97-2.00), and 1.31 (0.78-2.22) in women, respectively. The corresponding prevalence ratios (95% confidence interval) for glomerular hyperfiltration were 1.00 (0.93-1.08), 0.97 (0.91-1.03), 1.03 (0.94-1.13), and 1.39 (1.13-1.72) in men and 1.04 (0.95-1.14), 0.96 (0.90-1.04), 1.11 (1.02-1.20), and 1.28 (1.14-1.45) in women, respectively. Poor subjective sleep quality was associated with glomerular hyperfiltration in men and women.

CONCLUSION:

In this large study of young and middle-aged adults, we found that long sleep duration was associated with CKD and glomerular hyperfiltration. Additionally, poor subjective sleep quality was associated with increased prevalence of glomerular hyperfiltration, suggesting the importance of adequate quantity and quality of sleep for kidney function.

PMID:
28423054
PMCID:
PMC5396878
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0175298
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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