Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Ann Hum Genet. 2017 May;81(3):99-105. doi: 10.1111/ahg.12188.

Analysis of Circulating miR-1, miR-23a, and miR-26a in Atrial Fibrillation Patients Undergoing Coronary Bypass Artery Grafting Surgery.

Author information

1
Instituto Dante Pazzanese de Cardiologia Sao Paulo, São Paulo, BR.
2
School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo  São Paulo, São Paulo, BR.

Abstract

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia after cardiac surgery. From a pathophysiological point of view, a myriad of factors such as trauma, atrial dilation, ischemia, mechanical myopericarditis, autonomic imbalance, loss of connexins, AF nest remodeling, inflammation, sutures, and dysfunction caused by postextracorporeal circulation can contribute to postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) resulting in a longer hospital stay and consequently higher cost. Recent studies showed that short fragments of RNA, called microRNA (miRNA), can contribute to the development of several cardiovascular diseases, including AF. The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of circulating miRNAs (miR-1, -23a, and -26a) that can be involved in POAF. Patients submitted to coronary artery bypass graft surgery were grouped in POAF (24 patients) and without POAF (24 patients). Results showed older age, longer clamp-time, and more days in the intensive care unit as well as a longer total hospital stay in the POAF group. Preoperative levels of circulating miRNAs were similar. Analysis of miRNAs revealed significantly lower circulating levels of miRNA-23a (P  =  0.02) and -26a (P  =  0.01) in the POAF group during the postoperative period. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis showed the area under the ROC curve of miR-23a and miR-26a for predicting FA was 0.63 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.51-0.74; P  =  0.02) and 0.66 (95% CI: 0.55-0.77; P  =  0.01), respectively. Our data suggests that circulating miRNA-23a and -26a may be involved in the underlying biology of postoperative AF development.

KEYWORDS:

Coronary artery bypass graft surgery; postoperative atrial fibrillation and microRNA

PMID:
28422282
DOI:
10.1111/ahg.12188
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wiley
    Loading ...
    Support Center