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J Headache Pain. 2017 Dec;18(1):46. doi: 10.1186/s10194-017-0753-y. Epub 2017 Apr 18.

Level of physical activity, well-being, stress and self-rated health in persons with migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain.

Author information

1
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, P.O. Box 157, 221 00, Lund, Sweden. lotte.skytte.kroell@regionh.dk.
2
Danish Headache Centre, Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet-Glostrup, University of Copenhagen, Nordre Ringvej 69, 2600, Glostrup, Denmark. lotte.skytte.kroell@regionh.dk.
3
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, P.O. Box 157, 221 00, Lund, Sweden.
4
Danish Headache Centre, Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet-Glostrup, University of Copenhagen, Nordre Ringvej 69, 2600, Glostrup, Denmark.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The prevalence of migraine with co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain is high in the general population. However, there is very little literature on the characteristics of these combined conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate a) the prevalence of migraine with co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain in a clinic-based sample, b) the level of physical activity, psychological well-being, perceived stress and self-rated health in persons with migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain compared to healthy controls, c) the perceived ability of persons with migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain to perform physical activity, and d) which among the three conditions (migraine, tension-type headache or neck pain) is rated as the most burdensome condition.

METHODS:

The study was conducted at a tertiary referral specialised headache centre where questionnaires on physical activity, psychological well-being, perceived stress and self-rated health were completed by 148 persons with migraine and 100 healthy controls matched by sex and average age. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to assess characteristics of migraine, tension-type headache and neck pain.

RESULTS:

Out of 148 persons with migraine, 100 (67%) suffered from co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain. Only 11% suffered from migraine only. Persons with migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain had lower level of physical activity and psychological well-being, higher level of perceived stress and poorer self-rated health compared to healthy controls. They reported reduced ability to perform physical activity owing to migraine (high degree), tension-type headache (moderate degree) and neck pain (low degree). The most burdensome condition was migraine, followed by tension-type headache and neck pain.

CONCLUSIONS:

Migraine with co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain was highly prevalent in a clinic-based sample. Persons with migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain may require more individually tailored interventions to increase the level of physical activity, and to improve psychological well-being, perceived stress and self-rated health.

KEYWORDS:

Migraine; Neck pain; Physical activity; Psychological well-being; Self-rated health; Stress; Tension-type headache

PMID:
28421374
PMCID:
PMC5395520
DOI:
10.1186/s10194-017-0753-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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