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Rheumatol Int. 2017 Jul;37(7):1125-1134. doi: 10.1007/s00296-017-3717-2. Epub 2017 Apr 18.

Incidence of autoimmune diseases in patients with scabies: a nationwide population-based study in Taiwan.

Liu JM1,2,3, Chiu FH4,5, Lin CY6, Chang FW7, Hsu RJ8,9,10.

Author information

1
Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Taoyuan General Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, No. 1492, Chung-Shan Road, Taoyuan District, Taoyuan, 330, Taiwan.
2
Faculty of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.
3
Graduate Institute of Life Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, No. 161, Sec. 6, Minquan E. Road, Neihu District, Taipei, 114, Taiwan.
4
Department of Emergency Medicine, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 235, Taiwan.
5
Superintendent Office, Ningbo Medical Center, Lihuili Eastern Hospital, Ningbo City, 315000, Zhejiang Province, PR China.
6
Department of Pediatrics, Hsinchu MacKay Memorial Hospital, No. 690, Sec. 2, Guangfu Road, Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan.
7
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan.
8
Graduate Institute of Life Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, No. 161, Sec. 6, Minquan E. Road, Neihu District, Taipei, 114, Taiwan. hsurnai@gmail.com.
9
Department of Pathology and Graduate Institute of Pathology and Parasitology, The Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan. hsurnai@gmail.com.
10
Biobank Management Center of The Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan. hsurnai@gmail.com.

Abstract

Scabies is a commonly occurring infectious immune-mediated inflammatory skin disease. Immune-mediated inflammatory processes are also observed in autoimmune diseases. There have been very few previous studies; however, that have investigated the possible association between scabies and autoimmune diseases. To address this research gap, we conducted a nationwide population-based cohort study that included a total of 4481 scabies patients and 16,559 control subjects matched by gender, age, insured region, urbanization and income. We tracked both cohorts for a 7-year period to identify the incidence of autoimmune diseases in both groups during that follow-up period. Relatedly, a Cox regression analysis was performed to calculate and compare the hazard ratio (HR) for autoimmune diseases of both groups. An overall increased risk for 19 autoimmune diseases was observed in the scabies patients, with an adjusted HR (aHR) of 1.14 (95% CI 1.04-1.25). Compared with the control group, the scabies patients exhibited increased risks of hypersensitivity vasculitis (aHR 5.44, 95% CI 1.64-18.07), dermatomyositis (aHR 4.91, 95% CI 1.80-13.38), polyarteritis nodosa (aHR 2.89, 95% CI 1.46-5.73), systemic lupus erythematosus (aHR 2.73, 95% CI 1.33-5.64), psoriasis (aHR 2.31, 95% CI 1.85-2.88), myasthenia gravis (aHR 2.01, 95% CI 1.31-3.12), type 1 diabetes mellitus (aHR 1.93, 95% CI 1.53-2.44), pernicious anemia (aHR 1.92, 95% CI 1.42-2.61), and rheumatoid arthritis (aHR 1.43, 95% CI 1.12-1.83). In conclusion, the associations between scabies and a variety of autoimmune diseases may exist. Further studies are needed to clarify the shared etiologies and relationships between scabies and autoimmune diseases.

KEYWORDS:

Autoimmune diseases; National Health Insurance Research Database; Scabies

PMID:
28421357
DOI:
10.1007/s00296-017-3717-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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