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Pharmacol Rev. 2017 Jul;69(3):236-255. doi: 10.1124/pr.116.013474.

Emotional Modulation of Learning and Memory: Pharmacological Implications.

Author information

1
Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences and Interdisciplinary Neuroscience Program, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (R.T.L.); Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, University of California, Irvine, California (J.L.M.); and School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, University of Texas-Dallas, Richardson, Texas (C.K.M.) ryan-lalumiere@uiowa.edu.
2
Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences and Interdisciplinary Neuroscience Program, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (R.T.L.); Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, University of California, Irvine, California (J.L.M.); and School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, University of Texas-Dallas, Richardson, Texas (C.K.M.).

Abstract

Memory consolidation involves the process by which newly acquired information becomes stored in a long-lasting fashion. Evidence acquired over the past several decades, especially from studies using post-training drug administration, indicates that emotional arousal during the consolidation period influences and enhances the strength of the memory and that multiple different chemical signaling systems participate in this process. The mechanisms underlying the emotional influences on memory involve the release of stress hormones and activation of the basolateral amygdala, which work together to modulate memory consolidation. Moreover, work suggests that this amygdala-based memory modulation occurs with numerous types of learning and involves interactions with many different brain regions to alter consolidation. Additionally, studies suggest that emotional arousal and amygdala activity in particular influence synaptic plasticity and associated proteins in downstream brain regions. This review considers the historical understanding for memory modulation and cellular consolidation processes and examines several research areas currently using this foundational knowledge to develop therapeutic treatments.

PMID:
28420719
PMCID:
PMC5438110
DOI:
10.1124/pr.116.013474
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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