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Lupus. 2017 Sep;26(10):1051-1059. doi: 10.1177/0961203317692437. Epub 2017 Feb 23.

The prevalence and determinants of anti-DFS70 autoantibodies in an international inception cohort of systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

Author information

1
1 University of Calgary, Cumming School of Medicine.
2
2 Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre.
3
3 Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine and Department of Pathology, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre and Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
4
4 Lupus Program, Centre for Prognosis Studies in The Rheumatic Disease and Krembil Research Institute, Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
5
5 Instituto Nacional de CienciasMédicas y Nutrición, Mexico City, Mexico.
6
6 Rheumatology Research Group, Institute of Inflammation and Ageing, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
7
7 Department of Rheumatology, Hanyang University Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Seoul, Korea.
8
8 Divisions of Rheumatology and Clinical Epidemiology, McGill University Health Centre.
9
9 Cedars-Sinai/David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
10
10 Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK, USA.
11
11 Centre for Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University College London, UK.
12
12 Department of Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY, USA.
13
13 Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.
14
14 Arthritis Research UKCentre for Epidemiology, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, The University of Manchester; and NIHR Manchester Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre; Manchester, UK.
15
15 Thurston Arthritis Research Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
16
16 Division of Rheumatology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec et Université Laval, Québec City, Canada.
17
17 Mount Sinai Hospital and University Health Network, University of Toronto, Canada.
18
18 Center for Rheumatology Research, Landspitali University hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
19
19 Northwestern University and Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA.
20
20 Lupus Research Unit, The Rayne Institute, St Thomas' Hospital, King's College London School of Medicine, UK, London, UK.
21
21 Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY, USA.
22
22 Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA.
23
23 Allegheny Health Network, Pittsburgh Pennsylvania.
24
24 Department of Rheumatology, University Hospital Lund, Lund, Sweden.
25
25 Lanarkshire Centre for Rheumatology, Hairmyres Hospital, East Kilbride, Scotland UK.
26
26 Unit for Clinical Therapy Research (ClinTRID), Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
27
27 Josep Font Autoimmune Diseases Laboratory, IDIBAPS, Department of Autoimmune Diseases, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, Spain.
28
28 Autoimmune Diseases Research Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, BioCruces Health Research Institute, Hospital Universitario Cruces, University of the Basque Country, Barakaldo, Spain.
29
29 Emory University School of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
30
30 UCSD School of Medicine, La Jolla, CA, USA.
31
31 Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.
32
32 Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, USA.
33
33 University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
34
34 Department of Rheumatology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100, Copenhagen, Denmark.
35
35 Hospital for Joint Diseases, NYU, Seligman Centre for Advanced Therapeutics, New York NY.
36
36 New York School of Medicine, New York, US.
37
37 Inova Diagnostics Inc., San Diego, CA, USA.

Abstract

Autoantibodies to dense fine speckles 70 (DFS70) are purported to rule out the diagnosis of SLE when they occur in the absence of other SLE-related autoantibodies. This study is the first to report the prevalence of anti-DFS70 in an early, multinational inception SLE cohort and examine demographic, clinical, and autoantibody associations. Patients were enrolled in the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) inception cohort within 15 months of diagnosis. The association between anti-DFS70 and multiple parameters in 1137 patients was assessed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. The frequency of anti-DFS70 was 7.1% (95% CI: 5.7-8.8%), while only 1.1% (95% CI: 0.6-1.9%) were monospecific for anti-DFS70. In multivariate analysis, patients with musculoskeletal activity (Odds Ratio (OR) 1.24 [95% CI: 1.10, 1.41]) or with anti-β2 glycoprotein 1 (OR 2.17 [95% CI: 1.22, 3.87]) were more likely and patients with anti-dsDNA (OR 0.53 [95% CI: 0.31, 0.92]) or anti-SSB/La (OR 0.25 [95% CI: 0.08, 0.81]) were less likely to have anti-DFS70. In this study, the prevalence of anti-DFS70 was higher than the range previously published for adult SLE (7.1 versus 0-2.8%) and was associated with musculoskeletal activity and anti-β2 glycoprotein 1 autoantibodies. However, 'monospecific' anti-DFS70 autoantibodies were rare (1.1%) and therefore may be helpful to discriminate between ANA-positive healthy individuals and SLE.

KEYWORDS:

Antinuclear antibodies; DFS70; SLE; autoantibodies

PMID:
28420054
DOI:
10.1177/0961203317692437
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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