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Gut Microbes. 2017 Sep 3;8(5):493-503. doi: 10.1080/19490976.2017.1320468. Epub 2017 Apr 18.

Cultured microbes represent a substantial fraction of the human and mouse gut microbiota.

Author information

1
a ZIEL Institute for Food and Health, Core Facility Microbiome/NGS , Technical University of Munich , Munich , Germany.
2
b Leibniz-Institute DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures , Braunschweig , Germany.
3
c German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) , Partner site Hannover-Braunschweig , Braunschweig , Germany.
4
d Institute of Medical Microbiology, RWTH University Hospital , Aachen , Germany.

Abstract

During the last 15 years, molecular techniques have been preferred over culture-based approaches for the study of mammalian gut microbiota, i.e. the communities of microorganisms dwelling in the intestine of mammals. The main reason is the belief that the majority of gut bacteria, especially strict anaerobes, escape cultivation. Despite numerous such statements in publications, the literature does not provide a clear overview on the subject. In the present manuscript, we highlight recent work on the cultivation of bacteria from the intestine of mammals, review the literature and provide novel data pertaining to cultured fractions of mammalian gut microbiota. These data show that, despite marked inter-sample variations, 35 to 65% of molecular species detected by sequencing have representative strains in culture.

KEYWORDS:

16S rRNA gene; anaerobic cultivation; cultured fraction; dark matter; gut microbiota; intestinal bacteria; microbial diversity; minimal microbiome

PMID:
28418756
PMCID:
PMC5628658
DOI:
10.1080/19490976.2017.1320468
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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