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Support Care Cancer. 2017 Apr 17. doi: 10.1007/s00520-017-3665-0. [Epub ahead of print]

Effects of diet and exercise on weight-related outcomes for breast cancer survivors and their adult daughters: an analysis of the DAMES trial.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, 402 North Blackford Street, LD 133, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA. dbtometi@iupui.edu.
2
Department of Psychology, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, 402 North Blackford Street, LD 133, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA.
3
Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX, 77030, USA.
4
Duke University School of Medicine, DUMC 2713, Durham, NC, 27710, USA.
5
Duke Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, Duke University Medical Center, Duke Box 3003, Durham, NC, 27710, USA.
6
Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, NC, USA.
7
Department of Nutrition Sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1824 6th Ave. S., WTI 102M, Birmingham, AL, 35294, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Few trials have aimed to promote diet and exercise behaviors in both cancer survivors and their family members and examine their associations with weight-related outcomes. We conducted a secondary analysis to examine associations between change in diet and exercise behaviors and weight-related outcomes for overweight breast cancer survivors and their overweight adult daughters in the Daughters And MothErS Against Breast Cancer (DAMES) randomized trial.

METHODS:

The DAMES trial assessed the impact of two iteratively tailored, mailed print diet and exercise interventions against standard brochures over a 12-month period. This analysis examined change in diet and exercise behaviors and weight-related variables from baseline to post-intervention for the 50 breast cancer survivors and their adult daughters randomized to the intervention arms. To reduce the potential for type II error in this pilot, p values <0.10 were considered statistically significant.

RESULTS:

For mothers, change in diet quality was uniquely related to change in BMI (β = -0.12, p = 0.082), weight (β = -0.12, p = 0.060), and waist circumference (β = -0.38, p = 0.001), whereas change in caloric intake was related to waist circumference (β = 0.21, p = 0.002). For daughters, change in caloric intake was related to change in waist circumference (β = 0.12, p = 0.055). However, change in diet quality was not associated with weight-related outcomes in daughters. Additionally, change in exercise was not associated with weight-related outcomes in mothers or daughters.

CONCLUSIONS:

Findings support mail-based and other tailored interventions for weight loss in this population, with an emphasis on diet quality for breast cancer survivors and caloric intake for their adult daughters.

KEYWORDS:

Breast neoplasms; Diet; Exercise; First-degree relatives; Interventions; Weight loss

PMID:
28417203
DOI:
10.1007/s00520-017-3665-0
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