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Respir Med Case Rep. 2017 Apr 6;21:84-85. doi: 10.1016/j.rmcr.2017.03.024. eCollection 2017.

Progressive dyspnea due to pulmonary carcinoid tumorlets.

Author information

1
Division of Pulmonology, Department of Clinical Therapeutics, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens School of Medicine, Alexandra Hospital, Athens, Greece.
2
Pulmonary Department-Oncology Unit, "G. Papanikolaou" General Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.
3
Oncology Department, Interbalkan European Medical Center, Thessaloniki, Greece.
4
Surgery Department, Interbalkan European Medical Center, Thessaloniki, Greece.
5
Oncology Department, "G. Papageorgiou" University General Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
6
Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Changhai Hospital, The Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China.
7
Sana Clinic Group Franken, Department of Cardiology / Pulmonology / Intensive Care / Nephrology, "Hof" Clinics, University of Erlangen, Hof, Germany.

Abstract

This is a case description of a female patient, 77 years-old, who presented with progressive dyspnea and cough. She had a mild hypoxemia in the arterial blood gases (PaO2 72 mmHg) and normal spirometry. The chest computer tomography revealed diffuse "ground glass" opacities, segmental alveolitis, bronchiectasis, fibrotic lesions and numerous micronodules. A thoracoscopy was performed and the obtained biopsy showed carcinoid tumorlets, with positive CK8/18, CD56, TTF-1 and synaptophysin immunohistochemical markers. Pulmonary carcinoid tumorlets are rare, benign lesions and individuals with tumorlets are typically asymptomatic. Our report presents a symptomatic clinical case of carcinoid tumorlet.

KEYWORDS:

Dyspnea; Neuroendocrine lung cells hyperplasia; Nodules; Pulmonary carcinoid tumorlet

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